Tag Archives: Professional photographer

Building Your Photography Portfolio

portfolio small

Whether you are just starting out or have been a photographer for years, continuing to work on your portfolio is important. Keeping your portfolio up to date with only your best images, shows you in the best possible light.

The first step before deciding on your images is to decide who your target audience are. Who you are aiming your portfolio at? Consider what it is your audience what to see and tailor your portfolio to them.

Show only your best work, this might seem quite straight forward but if it seems like your portfolio is quite short, it is tempting to add in more images to pad it out. Don’t as less is more, also put your best work at the beginning and end, start and finish strong.

Make sure your portfolio flows and that there is a similar style all the way through.

Don’t use images that need explaining, you need the images to be self-explanatory.

Think about what format you want your portfolio to be in, online or in book form or both. Take your time to decide exactly what you want the look to be, especially if you decide to do print. Deciding on the size you want the images to be, and how you want the book to look.

If you are just getting started as a photographer offering to do free work in order to get an image you really want for your portfolio.

Go through your portfolio at least a couple of times a year to add new things and remove older ones that aren’t as good as the new ones you are adding.

Getting a second option, before making your portfolio final, get a second option ideally to someone who would be your target audience. Get them to give you their absolute honest option.

Lastly do not forget to make sure all your images are post processed to keep them looking at their best, download a free trial of PortraitPro, PortraitPro Body, LandscapePro and Smart Photo Editor to see how our software will work for you and cut down your editing time.

Want to Specialize in Wedding Photography?

shutterstock_397177582

It is wedding season once again and if you are thinking about specializing in wedding photography now is the time to start. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

When putting together your portfolio, only include weddings, yes you might have some other amazing shots but they won’t interest your prospective clients, and it reinforces the point that you specialize in weddings.

As a specialist, your prices will/can increase, to decide on your price have a look around at what other specialist wedding photographers charge and also what you think you are worth.

Going the extra mile – As a specialist you should really go that extra mile and make them feel special. Gifting the couple a free extra (such as a photo book or big canvas/print) when handing over their photos, makes their experience with you that much better. This will mean they will keep you in mind for anniversary photos and recommend you to people. Obviously this will be reflected in your pricing if you feel you an charge enough in your local area.

Creative shots  – Think/do a few creative shots that will really work and show the couples personality, the more you do the more knowledge you will get and knowing what will and won’t work. A little different from the usual wedding photos.

Marketing – This is key to growing your business, try to set aside some time every week to work on marketing.

Plan out – Plan ahead what shots you want to take, keep an eye on the weather forecast, know where you are shooting, visit before the wedding or if you can’t look online at photos and see what is around, bear in might what the couple want, they might have some clear ideas of what they want, do theirs but also some of your own.

Candid photographs – Only show the couple the good ones. Naturally happy and smiley, don’t just shot the ceremony, shot the bride getting ready, waiting at the altar, literally everything you think will give the couple that little bit extra and make it that more special when they get their photos.

Turn over time – When telling them how long until the photos are ready for them, don’t underestimate, there is nothing more annoying, give yourself plenty of time so you will be done early and they will see it as a nice surprise and feel valued.

Back Up your photos – I’m sure this goes without saying but back up your photos on the wedding day and on your finished images.

Post processing – Do not show any photos until you have edited them, this might seem like an easy one but the couple will be eagerly awaiting the images they might ask to see the unedited so they know what there is. It is best to make them wait for the perfect images.

shutterstock_560490145

PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body is a perfect companion for you, try out a free trial now to make the Bride and Groom look their very best.

Becoming a Full-Time Photographer

smallBecoming a full time photographer is a big step to make, you aren’t just becoming a professional photographer but you are also running your own business, meaning your aim is to be profitable and make money.

Here are a few tips to keep your business moving:

Budgeting – This is so key, as if you don’t do this properly, your business won’t succeed. You need to know how much you have to make to meet your current living costs and set aside a little money every month to cover taxes, and also incase any of your equipment breaks and you need to replace.

Prioritizing your time – You are a lot more productive if you have even a rough schedule of what you want to have done each day.

Setting your rates – It can be hard trying to think of what you think you are worth, but it is important not to under sell yourself and you need to earn enough to live off of, also don’t calculate what to charge by assuming you will be fully booked. Base it on what you need, what you think you are worth and in comparison to other local photographers.

Setting aside time to keep your business finance side of things in order – This is the least interesting part of your business, but it is essential that it is not forgotten about. A few hours per week is better than nothing.

Keep building up your client base – you may be busy now but you still need to bring in more clients to make sure you are always busy.

Marketing/Networking – You need people to remember you, as well as bringing in new clients. Sending emails every now and then is helpful, every month or so it makes sure your past clients and people who were interested don’t just forget about you. Too many emails will annoy people and have the opposite effect.

Keep/ get an organiser – This is a great way to keep all the business side of things together in one place.

Appointments book – so you don’t double book, you might think that this is an easy one and it won’t happen to you but it’s easy to forget and write down on scraps of paper that are lying around.

Keep all your receipts for equipment you buy, as these are business expenses so will be taken off money made for the amount of tax you need to pay, try to keep them in date order, but just having them all in one place is enough. If you lose a receipt you can’t claim it.

Insurance – Make sure to insurance your equipment.

Post processing – editing your images to make them look their best is very important, but it can take an age, but with our software (PortraitPro, PortraitPro Body, LandscapePro and Smart Photo Editor) is it really cuts the time you spend editing your photographs.

Good Luck!

 

Posing Tips for Portraits

shutterstock_156313724

Posing for portraits isn’t something I would call relaxing and as a photographer you want your clients to feel relaxed to get the best photos, so here are a few tips to help:

  • Try to build rapport with your clients, by asking them questions, keeping it light helps get that natural smile rather than a forced smile.
  • The background is important, if you are having a screen background, think about what color.
  • Instructing your clients where to put their hands really helps, as they always feel awkward when taking photographs, having a set place there to put them, helps the client relax.
  • Movement can be interesting in portrait photos, especially the hair can make a great image.
  • A 2/3rd turn is a very flattering position.
  • Don’t overdo the lighting as it can quickly go from being flattering to blinding, and your clients won’t feel relaxed with so much lighting pointed at them. Natural lighting is best, if possible.
  • People have a habit in photos to have their chin up too much, to get a good definition of the chin, your client should be looking at you, not down at the ground.
  • Guide your clients as to how to pose don’t say act natural with no directions, they aren’t models.
  • Clear communication is the most important thing to remember, you don’t want to confuse your client or getting them overthinking their poses.
  • Be happy and smile, you being in a good mood puts your client in a good mood.

I hope you found these useful, and don’t forget to try out PortraitPro, to give your portraits that extra wow factor.

Logo of The Societies of Photographers

Anthropics wins SWPP Customer Support Award

We’re absolutely delighted to announce that we were awarded the Customer Service Award at The Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers (SWPP) convention in London earlier this month.

This award is particularly special to us as it was awarded based on nominations and votes from you, our customers. We’re committed to providing all of our users with great, online support and we’re always pleased to hear that we’re doing a good job.

 

Logo of the 2017 SWPP Convention

If you’d like to get in touch with our support team, you can use our free online support system.

Alternatively, check out our FAQ page for simple solutions, or our forums to share your results with other users.

 

7 Reasons why being thankful will help you improve your photography and your life.

The secret of happiness is to count your blessings while others are adding up their troubles. ~ William Penn

Thanksgiving 2016

Thanksgiving is a great time to spend with family and loved ones, and as a photographer, it’s great to capture some great family moments.

It’s easy to remember what we’re thankful for when we’re surrounded by family and friends, but it’s an important thing to remember every other day of the year too.

  • Remembering to be thankful means that you’ll be more cheerful and generally happier; which is thought to be good for your health.
  • Being grateful makes you more likely to exercise; this is also good for your health.
  • Instead of focusing on the negative things, focus on the good. You have the skills and the knowledge to be a good photographer and to run your own business. Be grateful for the opportunity to do this.
  • Do a good turn for someone less fortunate than yourself, perhaps donating your images to a local hospital, or take photos for an animal adoption center? Be grateful that you have the time and the abilities to do this.
  • Be grateful for the family and friends you have around you who support you and care for you.
  • If you employ anyone other than just yourself, be grateful for your employee, and show them your gratitude for their hard work. Studies have found that expressions of gratitude are highly motivating, whereas criticism can be de-motivating.
  • Being grateful increases your self-esteem and your productivity. Be grateful for your creativity and your opportunity to work in a creative business.

Being happier and healthier will make it more enjoyable for your clients and anyone you work with. Your clients will enjoy spending their time with you in your studio or out on location, and their enjoyment will shine through your images, making them even better!

Happy Thanksgiving from all at Anthropics Technology!

Baby in pumpkin hat

Photo editing for New-Born baby portraits for Halloween

A new born baby swaddled in any wrap or blanket makes a good portrait, but Halloween themed portraits are particularly cute for any October baby.

In your collection of baby props, it’s a good idea to have some Halloween outfits for baby, perhaps a knitted pumpkin for baby to sleep in. A pumpkin themed wrap works for any autumn baby portrait, and a wicker basket could be wrapped in different colors for any occasion or season.

Neutral fabrics, and soft bean bags and blankets to curl the sleeping baby on will work for any season, and contrast with any color or outfit.  They’re a great investment for your business.

A sleeping baby in a peapod blanket

You can make or very easily purchase soft, knitted or crocheted blankets and wraps in a range of colors and textures. The simplest and softest fabrics and textures will give the most classic and timeless images.

  • It’s important to keep the baby safe, and warm and comfortable at all times. When working with children of any age, it’s always a little unpredictable, but there are some ways to make sure that your baby portrait sessions run as smoothly as possible.
  • It’s a good idea to ask that the baby has been fed and winded before the session, and then they’re at their most comfortable and most likely to fall asleep next.
  • Don’t attempt to put the baby into any potentially dangerous or uncomfortable positions.
  • Keep the parents around and on hand to help soothe the baby if they wake, or if you need an extra pair of hands to help position them.
  • It’s normal to take several shots of the baby, and combine them in post processing. If you’re not comfortable with combining several different shots, then keep your poses simple and safe.

Very little time and effort is needed to achieve beautiful baby portraits.

With Smart Photo Editor you can quickly and easily add vignettes and borders to your image, turn your image Black + White, or Sepia, and insert your watermark for web-ready images.

Try out Smart Photo Editor today.

Photo by Chuck Gloman

Interview with a Pro – Chuck Gloman

With the beginning of the new school year, we were inspired to chat to someone who teaches college classes in photography and film.  Chuck Gloman has been a long time user of PortraitPro.  He is Chair of the TV/Film Department, and Associate Professor of Professional Practice, at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.  We were thrilled to talk to him about his film and photo editing work.  

PortraitPro: How did you get into the film and photography industry?

Chuck Gloman: I entered the film industry right out of graduate school. I have been fortunate to have shot over 950 TV commercials and 200 short films. My still images have appeared on seven magazine covers; I have seven published textbooks and over 400 published articles.

PortraitPro: Are there any films or commercials you’ve been involved with that PortraitPro blog readers might know?

Chuck Gloman: I just completed a short film called “Lester’s Collection” that spans over 500 years. All of the female characters through the five centuries owe their “period look” to ProtraitPro. Costumes were part of the process, but creating a 1600’s look, Jane Austin look, 1920’s, 1940’s Technicolor, 1950’s Vistavision, 1960’s graininess, and 21st Century 4K images were all done in the editing process through software.

PortraitPro: Does the equipment you take on a shoot vary depending on the job?

Chuck Gloman: I used to be a Nikon guy, but for the last five years I used the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Mark III always shooting in Raw and JPEG.

PortraitPro: What’s in your typical bag / cases?

Chuck Gloman: Canon 5D Mark II body, Canon 24 – 70mm F2.8, 70 – 200mm F2.8, and 300mm F4 lens. Although I’m old school and grew up shooting film and using filters, now all of that is accomplished in Photoshop.

PortraitPro: What equipment do you have in your personal work kit?

Chuck Gloman: Video cameras – Canon EOS C100 and C300 and the Mark III. In post besides PortraitPro, I use Abobe Photoshop CC and Premiere Pro CC for video editing.

PortraitPro: Do you enjoy using any kind of camera, for instance a smartphone camera for more casual shots, or does it have to be the camera you mentioned above?

Chuck Gloman: Again, because I grew up with film, I never use my smartphone for images. I prefer to use the cameras I’ve mentioned above.

PortraitPro: What advice would you give students wanting to study film or photography at university level?

Chuck Gloman: As a professor, I tell my students that it’s not the equipment. Anyone can make an image look good. It’s the lighting, composition, framing, and story that make the film. Going to film school provides the experience and access to new technologies. The concepts are also stressed too. Our students at DeSales University start shooting their first week and have thirty to fifty films completed upon graduation. That means a great reel, resume, and a variety of crew experience.

PortraitPro: What sort of jobs and careers can students studying film and photography hope to get into?

Chuck Gloman: When I recruit students, I tell them that there isn’t a business or industry on the planet that does not do some type of filmmaking/photography. Whether it’s entertainment, public relations, communications, marketing, corporate, or anything else – someone needs to be trained/educated by watching a video on the process. Someone has to make this – a filmmaker.

PortraitPro: Can you tell us a bit about the classes you teach and the photography department at your University?

Chuck Gloman: I teach a variety of classes from Cinematography; Producing; Editing, Sound and Lighting; Basic Studio Productions; and Funding to Distribution (getting financing through Crowdfunding sources). Our photography classes are basic Digital Photography, Digital Storyboarding, Photoshop, and Advance Photography. In one session with our advanced class, we invited our dance department to do strobe images where their movement was frozen in time. The class members learned new skills and the dancers had images given to them shot at 1/250th of a second.

PortraitPro: Do you teach PortraitPro in your photography classes?

Chuck Gloman: In our basic classes, yes. Personally, I don’t believe I’ve shot a portrait in the last five years that I have not used PortraitPro.

PortraitPro: We can’t all come and study with you, can PortraitPro blog readers learn more from you? (Books, public talks, websites etc?)

Chuck Gloman: You never stop learning and learning something everyday from my students and just capturing images. Most of my books are somewhat dated and have been written before I became a full-time faculty member. The best way to see my work is through TV Technology, Digital Video, Government Video, and Shutterbug Magazine.

before after with PortraitPro by Chuck Gloman

Photo by Chuck Gloman

PortraitPro: Anything else you might want to add?

Chuck Gloman: Never let anyone tell you that you’re not doing it correctly. The more you shoot the better you become. If you stop growing and learning as an artist, you stagnate. I wake up everyday (hopefully) loving what I am about to do. If that ever stops becoming fun – I’ll stop. Hopefully that won’t happen for another 80 years.

Thanks for sharing your professional knowledge and for helping to inspire the next generation of photographers with your work. 

Check out the Film and TV department at De Sales University, Pennsylvania.

Try out PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body today.

PortraitPro Body on laptop

Anthropics Technology announces PortraitPro Body

Anthropics Technology has this week announced the launch of their latest offering, PortraitPro Body.

This brand new software from the makers of PortraitPro is the answer many PortraitPro users have been looking for to help their full body portrait editing. PortraitPro Body has features that will help professional portrait photographers in their everyday workflow.

Bride PortraitPro Body

 

PortraitPro Body works in a completely different way to ordinary airbrushing and warping software. “Due to the innate knowledge of human beauty that is built into PortraitPro Body, the highest quality full body portrait touch-up can be achieved by anyone in just a few minutes. It has a unique intuitive slider interface which gives users as much manual control as they like,” says Andrew Berend, CEO, Anthropics Technology. “PortraitPro Body was created in response to photographers’ need for a dedicated, easy-to-use body editing tool. Anthropics are delighted to continue introducing user-friendly, powerful software to improve photographers’ workflow and to expand their creativity.”

Features of PortraitPro Body:

  • Professional full-length photo editing in minutes
  • Body reshaping/contouring
  • Adjust build and height – intelligent controls with extensive sliders for fine tuning
  • Correct posture – natural fixes for camera distortions and unflattering posing
  • Smooth skin and remove blemishes – using ClearSkin™ technology
  • Face editing controls – adjust expression, smooth skin and re-light the face
  • Picture control tools
  • Dedicated shape tools
  • Easy slider interface

PortraitPro Body Male See the video for PortraitPro Body here.

Download your free trial of PortraitPro Body today.

 

Education isn't something you can finish

Photo editing in the new school year

The start of a new school year can be the start of a new phase for everyone, not just those returning to education. It can be a good time to think about engaging in a program of self-study. You can even begin a clean mid-year diary and completely start fresh.

Photography covers such a broad range of genres that there’s always something to learn and improve on. There’s always a new piece of equipment to try out or a different aspect of photography to learn about. Just as art itself covers a broad range of styles, photography also contains a range of types too.  There’s no time limit on when you can pick up your learning again.

Whether it’s your photography skills you want to improve, or you need to brush up on your business skills, there’s always something you can be doing to drive your photography business to the next level.

At Anthropics Technology we’re also constantly learning and developing even better software to help you even more in your work.  With version 15 we introduced new makeup controls to help you add makeup to your portrait editing.  With version 12 ( which immediately preceded v15)  we introduced relighting features so that you could edit your portraits with better lighting, so if the light you had available at the time wasn’t what you wanted it to be, you could produce a better image than you originally had.

PortraitPro 15 makeup before after

We’re proud to be award-winning, recently winning the Bauer Gear of the Year award for Best Plugin.  We’re always working to improve our software and to bring our loyal fans the features that will help them in their work and their leisure.

If you’ve already got to grips with PortraitPro, why not check out our latest addition to the collection, LandscapePro?

Challenge yourself to a new genre today and learn something new without going back to school.

Download your free trial of PortraitPro or LandscapePro.