Tag Archives: Portrait editing software

Photo by Chuck Gloman

Interview with a Pro – Chuck Gloman

With the beginning of the new school year, we were inspired to chat to someone who teaches college classes in photography and film.  Chuck Gloman has been a long time user of PortraitPro.  He is Chair of the TV/Film Department, and Associate Professor of Professional Practice, at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.  We were thrilled to talk to him about his film and photo editing work.  

PortraitPro: How did you get into the film and photography industry?

Chuck Gloman: I entered the film industry right out of graduate school. I have been fortunate to have shot over 950 TV commercials and 200 short films. My still images have appeared on seven magazine covers; I have seven published textbooks and over 400 published articles.

PortraitPro: Are there any films or commercials you’ve been involved with that PortraitPro blog readers might know?

Chuck Gloman: I just completed a short film called “Lester’s Collection” that spans over 500 years. All of the female characters through the five centuries owe their “period look” to ProtraitPro. Costumes were part of the process, but creating a 1600’s look, Jane Austin look, 1920’s, 1940’s Technicolor, 1950’s Vistavision, 1960’s graininess, and 21st Century 4K images were all done in the editing process through software.

PortraitPro: Does the equipment you take on a shoot vary depending on the job?

Chuck Gloman: I used to be a Nikon guy, but for the last five years I used the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Mark III always shooting in Raw and JPEG.

PortraitPro: What’s in your typical bag / cases?

Chuck Gloman: Canon 5D Mark II body, Canon 24 – 70mm F2.8, 70 – 200mm F2.8, and 300mm F4 lens. Although I’m old school and grew up shooting film and using filters, now all of that is accomplished in Photoshop.

PortraitPro: What equipment do you have in your personal work kit?

Chuck Gloman: Video cameras – Canon EOS C100 and C300 and the Mark III. In post besides PortraitPro, I use Abobe Photoshop CC and Premiere Pro CC for video editing.

PortraitPro: Do you enjoy using any kind of camera, for instance a smartphone camera for more casual shots, or does it have to be the camera you mentioned above?

Chuck Gloman: Again, because I grew up with film, I never use my smartphone for images. I prefer to use the cameras I’ve mentioned above.

PortraitPro: What advice would you give students wanting to study film or photography at university level?

Chuck Gloman: As a professor, I tell my students that it’s not the equipment. Anyone can make an image look good. It’s the lighting, composition, framing, and story that make the film. Going to film school provides the experience and access to new technologies. The concepts are also stressed too. Our students at DeSales University start shooting their first week and have thirty to fifty films completed upon graduation. That means a great reel, resume, and a variety of crew experience.

PortraitPro: What sort of jobs and careers can students studying film and photography hope to get into?

Chuck Gloman: When I recruit students, I tell them that there isn’t a business or industry on the planet that does not do some type of filmmaking/photography. Whether it’s entertainment, public relations, communications, marketing, corporate, or anything else – someone needs to be trained/educated by watching a video on the process. Someone has to make this – a filmmaker.

PortraitPro: Can you tell us a bit about the classes you teach and the photography department at your University?

Chuck Gloman: I teach a variety of classes from Cinematography; Producing; Editing, Sound and Lighting; Basic Studio Productions; and Funding to Distribution (getting financing through Crowdfunding sources). Our photography classes are basic Digital Photography, Digital Storyboarding, Photoshop, and Advance Photography. In one session with our advanced class, we invited our dance department to do strobe images where their movement was frozen in time. The class members learned new skills and the dancers had images given to them shot at 1/250th of a second.

PortraitPro: Do you teach PortraitPro in your photography classes?

Chuck Gloman: In our basic classes, yes. Personally, I don’t believe I’ve shot a portrait in the last five years that I have not used PortraitPro.

PortraitPro: We can’t all come and study with you, can PortraitPro blog readers learn more from you? (Books, public talks, websites etc?)

Chuck Gloman: You never stop learning and learning something everyday from my students and just capturing images. Most of my books are somewhat dated and have been written before I became a full-time faculty member. The best way to see my work is through TV Technology, Digital Video, Government Video, and Shutterbug Magazine.

before after with PortraitPro by Chuck Gloman

Photo by Chuck Gloman

PortraitPro: Anything else you might want to add?

Chuck Gloman: Never let anyone tell you that you’re not doing it correctly. The more you shoot the better you become. If you stop growing and learning as an artist, you stagnate. I wake up everyday (hopefully) loving what I am about to do. If that ever stops becoming fun – I’ll stop. Hopefully that won’t happen for another 80 years.

Thanks for sharing your professional knowledge and for helping to inspire the next generation of photographers with your work. 

Check out the Film and TV department at De Sales University, Pennsylvania.

Try out PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body today.

PortraitPro Body on laptop

Anthropics Technology announces PortraitPro Body

Anthropics Technology has this week announced the launch of their latest offering, PortraitPro Body.

This brand new software from the makers of PortraitPro is the answer many PortraitPro users have been looking for to help their full body portrait editing. PortraitPro Body has features that will help professional portrait photographers in their everyday workflow.

Bride PortraitPro Body

 

PortraitPro Body works in a completely different way to ordinary airbrushing and warping software. “Due to the innate knowledge of human beauty that is built into PortraitPro Body, the highest quality full body portrait touch-up can be achieved by anyone in just a few minutes. It has a unique intuitive slider interface which gives users as much manual control as they like,” says Andrew Berend, CEO, Anthropics Technology. “PortraitPro Body was created in response to photographers’ need for a dedicated, easy-to-use body editing tool. Anthropics are delighted to continue introducing user-friendly, powerful software to improve photographers’ workflow and to expand their creativity.”

Features of PortraitPro Body:

  • Professional full-length photo editing in minutes
  • Body reshaping/contouring
  • Adjust build and height – intelligent controls with extensive sliders for fine tuning
  • Correct posture – natural fixes for camera distortions and unflattering posing
  • Smooth skin and remove blemishes – using ClearSkin™ technology
  • Face editing controls – adjust expression, smooth skin and re-light the face
  • Picture control tools
  • Dedicated shape tools
  • Easy slider interface

PortraitPro Body Male See the video for PortraitPro Body here.

Download your free trial of PortraitPro Body today.

 

Education isn't something you can finish

Photo editing in the new school year

The start of a new school year can be the start of a new phase for everyone, not just those returning to education. It can be a good time to think about engaging in a program of self-study. You can even begin a clean mid-year diary and completely start fresh.

Photography covers such a broad range of genres that there’s always something to learn and improve on. There’s always a new piece of equipment to try out or a different aspect of photography to learn about. Just as art itself covers a broad range of styles, photography also contains a range of types too.  There’s no time limit on when you can pick up your learning again.

Whether it’s your photography skills you want to improve, or you need to brush up on your business skills, there’s always something you can be doing to drive your photography business to the next level.

At Anthropics Technology we’re also constantly learning and developing even better software to help you even more in your work.  With version 15 we introduced new makeup controls to help you add makeup to your portrait editing.  With version 12 ( which immediately preceded v15)  we introduced relighting features so that you could edit your portraits with better lighting, so if the light you had available at the time wasn’t what you wanted it to be, you could produce a better image than you originally had.

PortraitPro 15 makeup before after

We’re proud to be award-winning, recently winning the Bauer Gear of the Year award for Best Plugin.  We’re always working to improve our software and to bring our loyal fans the features that will help them in their work and their leisure.

If you’ve already got to grips with PortraitPro, why not check out our latest addition to the collection, LandscapePro?

Challenge yourself to a new genre today and learn something new without going back to school.

Download your free trial of PortraitPro or LandscapePro.

Gear of the Year Awards 2016

We are delighted to announce that PortraitPro 15 was awarded “Best Plugin” in the Bauer Gear of the Year Awards 2016.   Yesterday we were very pleased to attend the awards ceremony in cool East London.  It was fantastic to be nominated in these awards and even more fantastic to win in our category.

The photography magazines from Bauer, Practical Photography and Digital Photo have reviewed and enjoyed using PortraitPro Studio 15.

With a newly  launched website to go along with these fantastic titles, Bauer Media continue to lead the way in the UK’s photographic magazines.  Check out their new website here.

Digital Photo Sept 16 cover

Practical Photography September 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re constantly developing our software to ensure that we continue to bring you the latest and greatest developments in photo editing software.  The team here at Anthropics Technology are excited  to bring you industry award winning software.

Collecting the Gear of the Year Award

Marina and Briony collected the Bauer Gear of the Year Award for PortraitPro 15 – Photo by Cattrina Mott

Try out the award winning PortraitPro 15 today.

 

Senior portraits, high school boy

Portrait editing for your senior portraits Class of 2017

It’s time to start thinking about your next year’s high school seniors now.

Over the summer, while it’s still fresh in your mind from this season, it’s best to sit down and think about all the things that you think you could improve on from this year, for next year.

How could you have attracted more seniors?  More deals for groups of friends, offers on taking both Prom and Graduation photos, or an indoor / outdoor shoot package deal?

  • Next year recruit your brand ambassadors.  Pick a few key seniors to be your ambassadors for great high school memories. Ask candidates to apply and offer them their own photos free if they can bring you a certain number of clients, or a percentage of their class.  Be realistic on the numbers. If you live in a small town, you will never have huge numbers, but if a high percentage of the graduating class will remember your name over the next few months, you’re doing well.  Choose seniors who use their social media to share their images, and perhaps are involved with other school activities.  They might be able to get you on to other school related projects too.
  • Plan a questionnaire for your seniors to find out what they really like to do. This will help you think of locations and props that might be helpful for your sessions. Whatever they say, they’re probably not the only one in their class who likes those things.
  • Offer them advice on what to wear for their shoot. Their clothing should be what they’re comfortable in, but nothing too fashionable that will look dated in 10 or 20 years’ time.  Makeup should be natural, and hair for both boys and girls should be styled.  The more information and help you can offer them, the happier and more confident they will feel.  It’s a once in a lifetime moment that stay with them forever.
  • High School Seniors are likely to be the most nervous and self-conscious of your clients, so they need a little more reassurance that you can ensure that they will receive images that they will be happy to share with the family. With PortraitPro you can give them exactly that reassurance.
  • Use both indoor and outdoor locations for your seniors’ sessions.  With LandscapePro, you can also make sure your outdoor images  will stand the test of time too.
  • Use your own social media to reach out to your potential clients, and keep in touch with them throughout the process. Having a social media following can help increase your base of new clients.  Younger students will check out what older students have done before.

Check out our Pinterest board for inspiration on your senior portraits today.

photographer retouching portraits

7 tips to improve your portrait editing with PortraitPro

The beauty of PortraitPro is that you can make fine edits and can achieve a professional standard of portrait retouching with very little effort.

Although PortraitPro contains a number of presets that can offer a very quick portrait touch up, it is also possible to entirely customize the portrait retouching through the huge range of sliders and controls. You can even create your own; but first, spend some time getting to know the incredible range of portrait retouching controls available to you:

  • The re-lighting feature allows a great deal of adjustment on the lighting that was in the original image. Perhaps you have an image that was shot with only the available light and you want make it a little more flattering to your subject. With PortraitPro you have a huge range of lighting options available to you.
  • The facial outlines can be adjusted to ensure that the software has the outlines exactly where you want them by clicking the Back button in the top right of the editing screen
  • You can achieve incredible accuracy by zooming into the image to see a very fine level of detail.
  • When editing the area specified as skin, the intensity of the mask can be adjusted using the number keys on your keyboard. 1 = very subtle, and 9 = very strong.
  • The makeup can be edited as much or as little as you want; you can restore the original makeup, or you can edit over the top of the existing makeup, or if your model has no makeup, you can create a look entirely from scratch.
  • You can adjust the controls on the whole picture too, by using the Picture Controls, keeping the rest of the image in balance with the face.
  • Don’t forget the Reset to Original Image button that means you can turn everything off and start from no editing at all, and tweak each slider exactly as you want.

PortraitPro allows your portrait editing to be as subtle or as magazine-perfect as you wish.  You can give your clients the level of portrait retouching that they want and that you’re comfortable with doing. You don’t have to compromise your creativity in any way; PortraitPro allows you full freedom to express your vision as you wish.

Download the free trial today, and see how finely detailed, fully customizable your portrait editing can be.

How to survive making a living with Travel Photography.

Travel photography is not always going to make you a lot of money, but the freedom of the lifestyle can be particularly attractive.  Living life on your own terms and being your own boss can be a great motivator.  You have the flexibility to take on any project you want, and reject the ones you don’t.

working on the beach

You don’t have to take the plunge immediately; you can start by doing things in your vacation time, and spending weekends photographing in your own town.  Wherever you live, it’s exotic to someone else.

Here’s what else to do before you go:

  • Get all the education you possibly can while you can. Acquiring skills in writing, in technical photography knowledge, in geography, human interest and art is all going to be useful when you have only your skills and ideas to live by.
  • Build up a portfolio and put in the images that you want to be paid to shoot. Don’t use things that you don’t enjoy doing or you’ll end up doing more of them, because people will think you like them.
  • Set up a photography website to host and license your images. Choose one that links through to purchasing prints. This can save you time and makes it easier for the client to purchase your products.  It can be automated throughout the site, and the customer will have very little interaction with you. It’s very time effective for you.
  • If you have no obligations, mortgage contracts, loans, or people to take care of, then you can reduce your expenditure considerably. If you give up paying rent, you also don’t need to pay the gas and electricity bills either.  You can choose where to live, in hostels, hotels, camping, in any country you like.  ( Within visa restrictions etc.)
  • It may be helpful if you’re located somewhere that the exchange rate is favorable to your salary currency. This effectively makes your hotel bill cheaper, and you can afford a higher standard than you would elsewhere.
  • Be prepared to take any assignments. Be flexible and open minded on what jobs you take.
  • Set up accounts with micro stock sites. It may not make you a lot of money, but it should become a steady income. Think about the unusual images you could take for these sites, because the usual angle has already been done so many times.
  • Set up your laptop with all of your photo editing software. Have everything you could need ready, PortraitPro and LandscapePro will save you time on editing in Photoshop, and they can both be used as plugins to Photoshop.
  • Be prepared for anything you might find. Have an app for model releases; you don’t want to not be able to use the image because you missed getting the stranger to sign a release.
  • Look for apps that will save carrying extra things.  In fact, anything you can carry in an app effectively weighs nothing.  Maps, editing tools, ebooks, you can carry all kinds in an app and you’d have your smartphone with you anyway.
  • Keep your kit lightweight. Remember not to take everything you could possibly need. It weighs a lot and you’ll regret carrying that spare lens when you are so tired you can’t make it up the next staircase or mountain peak or down the next road to get the shot. The best camera is the one that you have with you, and having to make do with the reasonable camera you have with you can make you more creative to get the shot you want.

Girl with laptop and camera

When you do leave on your travels, there are some things you need to remember while you’re away to help you stay organized and productive:

  • Keep regular hours when you can. Do what you should to avoid jet lag; don’t work through the night because you’ve just left somewhere where you’d normally be awake at that time. Sometimes that means staying up a little longer, sometimes it means going to bed before you’re ready.
  • Stay focused every day. You need to stay focused on the 2 or 3 things that you need to achieve each day to continue making a living. Set achievable goals, and make sure you do them. Don’t get overloaded by trying to do too much in one day, just take each day at a time and make each day productive.
  • Make room for down-time. Every day that you take a break, is a day that you don’t make any income. This is tough when you’re your own boss. You still need to have the discipline to put in a day’s work, and also to give yourself a day’s break.  There’s no one to throw you out of the office if you’re still working at midnight.
  • Don’t underestimate the people you meet. You never know who you might meet when you’re traveling.  Travel is a great opportunity to meet people you wouldn’t otherwise have bumped into.  Step out of your comfort zone and go somewhere you wouldn’t usually think about going. You might be surprised, and you might find your next project.
  • Do your photo editing as you go. If you’re taking lots of images every day, then will need to back up your photos and should do your editing regularly. Discard the images that won’t make the cut often too, so you’re not storing images that you’ll really delete when you get home.
  • Doing your basic photo editing in PortraitPro or LandscapePro. Doing it while the original is still fresh in your mind, and while you still remember what you wanted to portray in your image is useful.

 

Declaration of Independence

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness in photography.

There’s a holiday weekend ahead and it is a great chance to put some time in to your own personal projects, and personal development.   As a freelance or self employed professional photographer you have a great deal of freedom in your work.  You make choices every day that affect how you work, how you run your business  and how you choose to be perceived.

It is your choices that make your personal brand unique. It is what brings people to you, for your unique style and vision.  This allows you to stand out and be different in a world where the market is becoming ever more saturated with people trying to become photographers.

An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest. – Ben Franklin. 

Choosing to continue learning and developing yourself is an investment that will reward you time and again.

Taking the time out of your regular schedule to learn more about your software, perhaps PortraitPro or LandscapePro which will help you achieve more in your personal work and in your professional life.

There are many incredible, professional photographers who use PortraitPro in their everyday work, and you can read about some of them right here on the PortraitPro blog.

PortraitPro’s batch processing mode can help you speed up processing your images from a particular shoot.  Create a preset, and then set it as the default, and then do your batch processing and all your images from that particular batch, perhaps one shoot,  can be processed with exactly the same style of portrait editing you require.

Don’t miss out on the whole holiday weekend. Batch processing saves you so much time and effort, you have plenty of time to spend with your loved ones, and do what you love; taking more photos.

If you love what you do, then take the holiday weekend to spend some time on your own projects and create something wonderful, and unique to you.   You have the Liberty to pursue the Happiness you want in your Life.

Check out our 4th July Pinterest page for more ideas for this holiday weekend.

Photographer looking at the Golden Gate Bridge San Francisco

Making an income from photography – Selling your photography from your own website

When you’re making a living as a professional photographer, there might be many ways in which you can use your photography to make an income.

We’ve talked previously about selling your photography to micro stock sites, keeping a travel blog, and selling your street photography, but it’s also important to maintain your own website.  Whether you sell through another site or not, it’s good to be found on your own page, and to have a direct way of contacting you and verifying who you are and what you do.

Your own website might be one of the main ways that your clients of any type will find you.  Perhaps you’re not a studio photographer in the traditional sense; perhaps you work entirely on location projects like weddings, or even travel photography.  If your clients are international, it will certainly be the best way to find you.

If you’re shooting landscape photography, travel photography, or street photography, one of the ways you might want to make money out of this is by selling your images online.  Photo editing software can greatly improve your images. It’s not always the case that you’re going to find the lighting and the landscape exactly how you want it, or that it will turn out in exactly the way you saw it.

There are several micro stock photo websites out there that you can use to sell your images, but the downside to this is that you lose a percentage of the sales to the website you use.

It may work out better for you to sell your own images through your own website. There are a number of ways to do this.  If you use a WordPress blog, there are plugins for the website that you can add to help you sell your images.

Another way to sell your own images is that you can set up a website that is already integrated to allow customers to order your photo print products from a print service.  There are a number of sites that will host your images and they each integrate with a different range of print labs. So it’s up to you to decide who works for you best, depending on the location of your customers, and your print lab preferences.

Whichever way you do it, you need to consider the costs involved. There’s the cost of setting up a WordPress page, and deciding whether you want your own domain name, and if you do, who is going to host it for you, and there’s a cost involved for that too. If you want something more bespoke, then you need to pay someone to do it for you, and you need a way of being able to update it yourself.

Photographer at Grand Canyon

If you’re keeping a lot of images on your site for customers to browse, then it’s going to need a lot of storage space to hold them all. Don’t forget to watermark your images if that’s your preference for dealing with image theft.

You can use your favorite photo editing software to enhance your images. Anthropics’ photo editing software PortraitPro, Smart Photo Editor and our recently launched, LandscapePro can all help you enhance your images in a professional way.

Download the free trials of each today.

cute family

Great portrait editing can help repeat business

People who have previously bought from you, and already had a session with you, are more likely to return.  There’s already a relationship established, they know they will get something they will like, because they liked it before.

And yes, it validates their original purchase decision that might even have been several years before. If the decision to use you again for their portraits is the correct decision, then it was the correct one back then too.

There are benefits for you in the customer in returning. You already know their story; you’ve met most of them before. If you did the engagement and wedding shoots for a couple, it’s nice for them to return to celebrate a new baby.  There’s continuity, and they know that the images that they get to keep around their home will have a similar artistic style.

Perhaps this session is to celebrate the arrival of a new addition. You’ve already succeeded in keeping the kids entertained, or managed to squeeze in the family pet, and keep them happy too!

Make sure that your studio is warm and welcoming, especially if you’re dealing with small children and babies. There’s nothing so grumpy as a chilly child. Have some entertaining toys and books and make them feel a part of the whole experience.  If the child also has a good experience, the parents will be happy to return to you too, as you made their life much more pleasant too!

cute, happy baby portrait

Great customer service is invaluable to your business, when people have a great time, they will tell their friends what a good experience they had with you.  If you can make them feel special, and feel that you went the extra mile just for them, then they will feel that they got a great service.

Your portrait editing software can give you the edge on great portrait retouching. You can tailor the preset to suit your style, and you can customize this for each client.

If the client likes you enough to want to return, they’re sure to want to tell their friends about you too, and the great experience that they had with you. Offering a reward for returning customers can help you create a loyal customer who won’t go anywhere else for their family portraits.

Happy families make for great portraits, and for returning customers.

Try out PortraitPro for yourself today.