Tag Archives: photo editing

LandscapePro 2 Tutorial – Sky Reflections

This week we’ll be looking at one of our other products, LandscapePro 2.

LandscapePro is an intelligent, easy-to-use and powerful tool for outdoor photographers. Whether you’re looking for simple color corrections or total transformations, LandscapePro puts dozens of intelligent controls at your fingertips.
To join in with the tutorial, download the free trial and head on over to Unsplash and download the example image. This image is provided by landscape and wedding photographer Blake Verdoorn. We’re hoping to score an interview with him in the next few weeks so look out for that in an upcoming post!

Don’t forget to share your results with us via our Facebook page.
If you have any questions or need assistance, our customer support team will be happy to help.

Want to Specialize in Wedding Photography?

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It is wedding season once again and if you are thinking about specializing in wedding photography now is the time to start. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

When putting together your portfolio, only include weddings, yes you might have some other amazing shots but they won’t interest your prospective clients, and it reinforces the point that you specialize in weddings.

As a specialist, your prices will/can increase, to decide on your price have a look around at what other specialist wedding photographers charge and also what you think you are worth.

Going the extra mile – As a specialist you should really go that extra mile and make them feel special. Gifting the couple a free extra (such as a photo book or big canvas/print) when handing over their photos, makes their experience with you that much better. This will mean they will keep you in mind for anniversary photos and recommend you to people. Obviously this will be reflected in your pricing if you feel you an charge enough in your local area.

Creative shots  – Think/do a few creative shots that will really work and show the couples personality, the more you do the more knowledge you will get and knowing what will and won’t work. A little different from the usual wedding photos.

Marketing – This is key to growing your business, try to set aside some time every week to work on marketing.

Plan out – Plan ahead what shots you want to take, keep an eye on the weather forecast, know where you are shooting, visit before the wedding or if you can’t look online at photos and see what is around, bear in might what the couple want, they might have some clear ideas of what they want, do theirs but also some of your own.

Candid photographs – Only show the couple the good ones. Naturally happy and smiley, don’t just shot the ceremony, shot the bride getting ready, waiting at the altar, literally everything you think will give the couple that little bit extra and make it that more special when they get their photos.

Turn over time – When telling them how long until the photos are ready for them, don’t underestimate, there is nothing more annoying, give yourself plenty of time so you will be done early and they will see it as a nice surprise and feel valued.

Back Up your photos – I’m sure this goes without saying but back up your photos on the wedding day and on your finished images.

Post processing – Do not show any photos until you have edited them, this might seem like an easy one but the couple will be eagerly awaiting the images they might ask to see the unedited so they know what there is. It is best to make them wait for the perfect images.

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PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body is a perfect companion for you, try out a free trial now to make the Bride and Groom look their very best.

1940s Glamorous Photo Shoot Post Processing

Doing decades photo shoots can be really fun and glamorous and with PortraitPro you can make your images look even better within minutes.

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Open your image in PortraitPro, the software will identity the face and have a pretty accurate mark up,  You can move the mark up dots to make it as accurate as possible to get the best results.

preset glamourois

Once you have adjusted the mark up, chose the Preset Glamorous on the top of the right hand side. This does most of the work for you, leaving you to just make your own personal preference tweaks to the images.

unsharpen the eyes a little bit

I reduce the sharpness of the eyes a very small amount.

make up lipstick

I also change the color of lipstick, red was a very popular color for lipstick in the 1940s, but due to the softness of my image due to her outfit I have gone for a pink color instead.

Simply chose your preference shade for the selection, it is important to make sure your lips are marked up accurately, it is simply if they aren’t quite right. You can change the mark up on the left hand image at any time.

hair

Next I change the color of the hair, as auburn hair was a popular color back then.

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To do this, under the hair settings, click the View/edit Hair Area button. All the hair should appear pink, go over any bits that aren’t selected and click OK.

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Click through all the hair colors selecting the colors, that you like before deciding on your final color.

final temperature all way up copy

The last change that I make to the image is under Picture Controls, I move the  Vibrance slider up to full on this setting, this make the colors move in line with what you would get in the 1940s.

before and after

This took hardly anytime and you can really see the improvement in the image, and with Studio Max you can batch process them to save even more time.

To try this out for yourself, download a free trial of PortraitPro now.

Travel Photography 101: Everything You Need to Know

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Travel Photography sounds wonderful but there’s a fair bit to it, here are a few tips, equipment list suggestion and how to make money for Travel Photography.

Tips

Research – Look up where you are going, what is around and put together a list of places that you want to photograph. Be selective so you can spend a fair amount of time in each location to get the best shots possible.

Know your gear – Whether you are buying new gear or not, a little before you go, it is a good idea to have a play around a week or two before you go away. Just to refresh your memory.

Get up early/stay up late – In order to catch the best shots, sunrise and sunset usually are the best time to photograph, so take this into consideration when planning your shots.

Picking the right accommodation – Choosing the right location for accommodation is really important. Be close to where you want to shot.

Get inspired – Look at other photographers photographs of where you are going, to help you decide what locations you want to go to and to be inspired. Ask them where the photo was taken if it isn’t written anywhere.

Experience their culture – Whilst travelling try to immerse in their culture as much as possible – food, music and local markets, etc.

Travel light – Try to travel as light as possible, don’t load yourself down by trying to take every camera and lens you own with you, just take a main lens and one to zoom, especially if you are going trekking or hiking. You don’t want to be too loaded down.

Be selective of where you are visiting – Don’t try and squeeze absolutely every location there is to visit, pick your favorite and spend more time there taking pictures, rather than rushing around trying to capture everything.

Don’t always be behind your lens – Experience where you are rather than constantly being behind your camera.

High angle shot – Try to find somewhere to take a good birds eye shot.

Your camera doesn’t have to break the bank – Don’t feel the need to go out and buy a brand new top end camera for your trip, you can get great shots on the camera you already have.

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Equipment

  •  Camera body
  •  Backpack – One opens from the back, makes it safer and a lot of secure. Have it organised, using pouches is a good idea making being able to find things quickly.
  • Spare batteries – It’s a good idea to have at least one spare batteries in your backpack.
  • Lenses – only need one of two lenses.
  • Small Camera/Action Camera – Having an action camera/small camera to take quick photos. Action cameras can have window mounts and you can film travelling on train or car.
  • Back Up/Laptop – Backing up your images is super important, save at least one place if not two.
  • Portable Charger – To Keep your phone charged, they also work on charging some cameras as well, so check to see if it will work on yours.
  • Shoulder Strap/Camera Clip – Keeping your camera ready to go at all times.
  • Tripod
  • Camera Filters – Just like with lenses only take one or two.
  • Lenses cleaner
  • Mini Torch
  • Camera Remote

 

Settings for Camera When Moving

When travelling in a moving car/helicopter a good camera settings are:

Manual Mode

Shutter Speed – 1/1000 + (higher for  helicopter)

Aperture – wide depth of field f/8-11

ISO Auto mode

For in a car have the window open.

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Making Money as a Travel Photographer

Making money as a travel photographer can be a slow starter, as you already need to have a portfolio. Speculative or commission based are your two options.

Speculative is where you go to a location first then afterwards try to sell your images, either as stock images, prints or to advertising. This will mean you aren’t guaranteed to make back any money from your trips, so only plan to go to places you would go anyway.

Commission based is going somewhere you already know you will be paid some money for whether you were commissioned by an advertising firm or if you had contacted the tourism board/ local hotels and have an agreement, this will most likely not be the entire cost of your trip but could be a fee or free accommodation in exchange for your images to be used for their advertising.

Website

To be able to make it as a Travel Photographer you need a website and an Instagram account. Instagram account is becoming more and more the source that agencies and clients will go to first before your website, so both need to be uniform and relate to each other. This is your brand and you want one clear image of who you are to come across.

Post Processing

Don’t forget to edit your photos, to make your image look their very best. LandscapePro is great for editing your travel photos quickly, click here to download a free trial.

Becoming a Full-Time Photographer

smallBecoming a full time photographer is a big step to make, you aren’t just becoming a professional photographer but you are also running your own business, meaning your aim is to be profitable and make money.

Here are a few tips to keep your business moving:

Budgeting – This is so key, as if you don’t do this properly, your business won’t succeed. You need to know how much you have to make to meet your current living costs and set aside a little money every month to cover taxes, and also incase any of your equipment breaks and you need to replace.

Prioritizing your time – You are a lot more productive if you have even a rough schedule of what you want to have done each day.

Setting your rates – It can be hard trying to think of what you think you are worth, but it is important not to under sell yourself and you need to earn enough to live off of, also don’t calculate what to charge by assuming you will be fully booked. Base it on what you need, what you think you are worth and in comparison to other local photographers.

Setting aside time to keep your business finance side of things in order – This is the least interesting part of your business, but it is essential that it is not forgotten about. A few hours per week is better than nothing.

Keep building up your client base – you may be busy now but you still need to bring in more clients to make sure you are always busy.

Marketing/Networking – You need people to remember you, as well as bringing in new clients. Sending emails every now and then is helpful, every month or so it makes sure your past clients and people who were interested don’t just forget about you. Too many emails will annoy people and have the opposite effect.

Keep/ get an organiser – This is a great way to keep all the business side of things together in one place.

Appointments book – so you don’t double book, you might think that this is an easy one and it won’t happen to you but it’s easy to forget and write down on scraps of paper that are lying around.

Keep all your receipts for equipment you buy, as these are business expenses so will be taken off money made for the amount of tax you need to pay, try to keep them in date order, but just having them all in one place is enough. If you lose a receipt you can’t claim it.

Insurance – Make sure to insurance your equipment.

Post processing – editing your images to make them look their best is very important, but it can take an age, but with our software (PortraitPro, PortraitPro Body, LandscapePro and Smart Photo Editor) is it really cuts the time you spend editing your photographs.

Good Luck!

 

How to Improve Your Wildlife Photos in Minutes

When you look through your photos, do you sometimes feel like you didn’t quite capture the true colors?

Animals are often one of these photos. Well here is a short tutorial on how to improve these photos, using LandscapePro and takes only minutes to do.

 

tiger 1

Once you have opened LandscapePro and uploaded your photo, you get asked to label what is in your photo.

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After labeling the area, LandscapePro does a pretty good job and selecting the area for you but just need to go use the Pull tool and others on the left hand side to get this how you want, though you can come back and correct this later.

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The next step is choosing what to change first, for this I am going to be getting the animal (tiger) first, so click on the animal tab to get the sliders to show.

It’s really easy to adjust the appearance of the animal, its easy and quick, moving the sliders you seeing the change instantly. If you liked it best how it was originally just double click on the slider.

There is also Presets tab at the top where you opened the animal tab, click on this, there is a long list of different presetting you can apply to your picture rather than trying to get your desired outcome using the sliders.

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Next I click on the water tab, to change the settings, just a little bit.

After this you can change the picture as a whole, but if you have already edited all the image separately you don’t need to use this.

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The Tigers orange fur really stands out now in the finished photograph.

tiger before and after

To see just how dramatic the difference is, above is the before and after, side by side. This only took a few minutes to do!

Making your wildlife photos really stand out, download your free trial of LandscapePro today.

Check out this tutorial on black and white wildlife photography.

 

When it’s cold and wintry outside, it’s time for photo editing

The temperature is dropping and the nights are getting darker, so why not spend some warm, cozy winter evenings with your photo editing software?

With a range of photo editing tools, you can now use Anthropics software to retouch any type of photograph.

If portraits are your thing, then PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body will have plenty to help you improve your portrait photography.

If you prefer any type of landscape or street photography, then LandscapePro will help you enhance skies, buildings, fields and water.

Downtown LA in Mist

Winter is great for capturing landscapes in different conditions; snowy landscapes, and misty mornings on the mountain-tops. They all make great images, but they do require you to leave the warmth and comfort of your sofa.

Getting up early and capturing some misty mornings or snow in the distance can be really rewarding; but if you just can’t beat the chill and need an evening curled up by the fire, then what better excuse than the photo retouching you need to do?

photo editing in cozy, hygge

Anthropics software makes everything so much easier, so you’ll have more time to just relax with your loved ones.  If you want to go beyond just enhancing your images and get really creative, you can add effects with Smart Photo Editor.

Try out all the Anthropics software today and see what photo enhancements you can make.

Photo by Chuck Gloman

Interview with a Pro – Chuck Gloman

With the beginning of the new school year, we were inspired to chat to someone who teaches college classes in photography and film.  Chuck Gloman has been a long time user of PortraitPro.  He is Chair of the TV/Film Department, and Associate Professor of Professional Practice, at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.  We were thrilled to talk to him about his film and photo editing work.  

PortraitPro: How did you get into the film and photography industry?

Chuck Gloman: I entered the film industry right out of graduate school. I have been fortunate to have shot over 950 TV commercials and 200 short films. My still images have appeared on seven magazine covers; I have seven published textbooks and over 400 published articles.

PortraitPro: Are there any films or commercials you’ve been involved with that PortraitPro blog readers might know?

Chuck Gloman: I just completed a short film called “Lester’s Collection” that spans over 500 years. All of the female characters through the five centuries owe their “period look” to ProtraitPro. Costumes were part of the process, but creating a 1600’s look, Jane Austin look, 1920’s, 1940’s Technicolor, 1950’s Vistavision, 1960’s graininess, and 21st Century 4K images were all done in the editing process through software.

PortraitPro: Does the equipment you take on a shoot vary depending on the job?

Chuck Gloman: I used to be a Nikon guy, but for the last five years I used the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Mark III always shooting in Raw and JPEG.

PortraitPro: What’s in your typical bag / cases?

Chuck Gloman: Canon 5D Mark II body, Canon 24 – 70mm F2.8, 70 – 200mm F2.8, and 300mm F4 lens. Although I’m old school and grew up shooting film and using filters, now all of that is accomplished in Photoshop.

PortraitPro: What equipment do you have in your personal work kit?

Chuck Gloman: Video cameras – Canon EOS C100 and C300 and the Mark III. In post besides PortraitPro, I use Abobe Photoshop CC and Premiere Pro CC for video editing.

PortraitPro: Do you enjoy using any kind of camera, for instance a smartphone camera for more casual shots, or does it have to be the camera you mentioned above?

Chuck Gloman: Again, because I grew up with film, I never use my smartphone for images. I prefer to use the cameras I’ve mentioned above.

PortraitPro: What advice would you give students wanting to study film or photography at university level?

Chuck Gloman: As a professor, I tell my students that it’s not the equipment. Anyone can make an image look good. It’s the lighting, composition, framing, and story that make the film. Going to film school provides the experience and access to new technologies. The concepts are also stressed too. Our students at DeSales University start shooting their first week and have thirty to fifty films completed upon graduation. That means a great reel, resume, and a variety of crew experience.

PortraitPro: What sort of jobs and careers can students studying film and photography hope to get into?

Chuck Gloman: When I recruit students, I tell them that there isn’t a business or industry on the planet that does not do some type of filmmaking/photography. Whether it’s entertainment, public relations, communications, marketing, corporate, or anything else – someone needs to be trained/educated by watching a video on the process. Someone has to make this – a filmmaker.

PortraitPro: Can you tell us a bit about the classes you teach and the photography department at your University?

Chuck Gloman: I teach a variety of classes from Cinematography; Producing; Editing, Sound and Lighting; Basic Studio Productions; and Funding to Distribution (getting financing through Crowdfunding sources). Our photography classes are basic Digital Photography, Digital Storyboarding, Photoshop, and Advance Photography. In one session with our advanced class, we invited our dance department to do strobe images where their movement was frozen in time. The class members learned new skills and the dancers had images given to them shot at 1/250th of a second.

PortraitPro: Do you teach PortraitPro in your photography classes?

Chuck Gloman: In our basic classes, yes. Personally, I don’t believe I’ve shot a portrait in the last five years that I have not used PortraitPro.

PortraitPro: We can’t all come and study with you, can PortraitPro blog readers learn more from you? (Books, public talks, websites etc?)

Chuck Gloman: You never stop learning and learning something everyday from my students and just capturing images. Most of my books are somewhat dated and have been written before I became a full-time faculty member. The best way to see my work is through TV Technology, Digital Video, Government Video, and Shutterbug Magazine.

before after with PortraitPro by Chuck Gloman

Photo by Chuck Gloman

PortraitPro: Anything else you might want to add?

Chuck Gloman: Never let anyone tell you that you’re not doing it correctly. The more you shoot the better you become. If you stop growing and learning as an artist, you stagnate. I wake up everyday (hopefully) loving what I am about to do. If that ever stops becoming fun – I’ll stop. Hopefully that won’t happen for another 80 years.

Thanks for sharing your professional knowledge and for helping to inspire the next generation of photographers with your work. 

Check out the Film and TV department at De Sales University, Pennsylvania.

Try out PortraitPro and PortraitPro Body today.

Where to capture iconic images on your summer vacation

Travelling and taking a break from normality is good for the soul and it’s good for your creativity.  If you’re booking a last minute summer vacation and you need some inspiration for some great iconic images to capture, here’s our top five places to photograph.

New York

The must have shot: Take a trip to Top of The Rock, for that not to be missed shot of Lower Manhattan with the Empire State Building too.

View of Empire State building from Top of the Rock

 

The Non-Tourist shot: it’s virtually impossible to find anything that hasn’t been done before in New York, but check out the rooftop bars for some other unusual angles, plus, they’re free to visit.

Chicago

The must have shot: Everyone heads to Millennium Park and Cloud Gate for the iconic shot of the Bean as the sculpture is affectionately known.

The Non-Tourist shot: The neo-gothic Chicago Tribune Tower may be another very much photographed building, but head to the top of the building, to The Crown at Tribune Tower for an unusual angle on an iconic building.

Philadelphia

The must have shot: In the City of Brotherly Love, it has to be the LOVE sculpture in Love Park, officially known as JFK Plaza, with its view down Benjamin Franklin Parkway to the Art Museum too. 

LOVE Park or JFK Plaza

The Non-Tourist shot: Off the beaten track, head down to Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens for some great mosaic artwork, and wander along South Street to take in the alternative side of the city.

Street Art on South Street Philadelphia

Grand Canyon

The must have shot: The Grand Canyon Skywalk, located at the West Rim, gives anyone the chance to view the Grand Canyon from above, where previously you’d have needed a helicopter to capture a similar view.

The Non-Tourist shot: It’s wise not to go off the beaten track in Grand Canyon National Park, and if you want to go further afield, then take a guide with you.  But for an alternative view, and thought to be the best view, at the South Rim, then take a trip to Bright Angel Lodge, and the Bright Angel Trail.

Photographer at Grand Canyon

Las Vegas

The must have shot: The fountains at the Bellagio are a not to be missed spectacle. The great thing about Vegas is that all the hotels are freely open to wander around like indoor towns within a town.  Try dining at a different hotel every day and a different sight to photograph every night too.

The Non-Tourist shot: Everyone heads to the Strip, but don’t miss a taste of old Vegas, and the light show at the Fremont Street Experience.

With photo editing software PortraitPro andLandscapePro  to help you get the best from your shots, there’s even more reason to book that trip now.  It’s good for you.

photographer retouching portraits

7 tips to improve your portrait editing with PortraitPro

The beauty of PortraitPro is that you can make fine edits and can achieve a professional standard of portrait retouching with very little effort.

Although PortraitPro contains a number of presets that can offer a very quick portrait touch up, it is also possible to entirely customize the portrait retouching through the huge range of sliders and controls. You can even create your own; but first, spend some time getting to know the incredible range of portrait retouching controls available to you:

  • The re-lighting feature allows a great deal of adjustment on the lighting that was in the original image. Perhaps you have an image that was shot with only the available light and you want make it a little more flattering to your subject. With PortraitPro you have a huge range of lighting options available to you.
  • The facial outlines can be adjusted to ensure that the software has the outlines exactly where you want them by clicking the Back button in the top right of the editing screen
  • You can achieve incredible accuracy by zooming into the image to see a very fine level of detail.
  • When editing the area specified as skin, the intensity of the mask can be adjusted using the number keys on your keyboard. 1 = very subtle, and 9 = very strong.
  • The makeup can be edited as much or as little as you want; you can restore the original makeup, or you can edit over the top of the existing makeup, or if your model has no makeup, you can create a look entirely from scratch.
  • You can adjust the controls on the whole picture too, by using the Picture Controls, keeping the rest of the image in balance with the face.
  • Don’t forget the Reset to Original Image button that means you can turn everything off and start from no editing at all, and tweak each slider exactly as you want.

PortraitPro allows your portrait editing to be as subtle or as magazine-perfect as you wish.  You can give your clients the level of portrait retouching that they want and that you’re comfortable with doing. You don’t have to compromise your creativity in any way; PortraitPro allows you full freedom to express your vision as you wish.

Download the free trial today, and see how finely detailed, fully customizable your portrait editing can be.