Tag Archives: Love what you do

Travel Photography 101: Everything You Need to Know

travel

Travel Photography sounds wonderful but there’s a fair bit to it, here are a few tips, equipment list suggestion and how to make money for Travel Photography.

Tips

Research – Look up where you are going, what is around and put together a list of places that you want to photograph. Be selective so you can spend a fair amount of time in each location to get the best shots possible.

Know your gear – Whether you are buying new gear or not, a little before you go, it is a good idea to have a play around a week or two before you go away. Just to refresh your memory.

Get up early/stay up late – In order to catch the best shots, sunrise and sunset usually are the best time to photograph, so take this into consideration when planning your shots.

Picking the right accommodation – Choosing the right location for accommodation is really important. Be close to where you want to shot.

Get inspired – Look at other photographers photographs of where you are going, to help you decide what locations you want to go to and to be inspired. Ask them where the photo was taken if it isn’t written anywhere.

Experience their culture – Whilst travelling try to immerse in their culture as much as possible – food, music and local markets, etc.

Travel light – Try to travel as light as possible, don’t load yourself down by trying to take every camera and lens you own with you, just take a main lens and one to zoom, especially if you are going trekking or hiking. You don’t want to be too loaded down.

Be selective of where you are visiting – Don’t try and squeeze absolutely every location there is to visit, pick your favorite and spend more time there taking pictures, rather than rushing around trying to capture everything.

Don’t always be behind your lens – Experience where you are rather than constantly being behind your camera.

High angle shot – Try to find somewhere to take a good birds eye shot.

Your camera doesn’t have to break the bank – Don’t feel the need to go out and buy a brand new top end camera for your trip, you can get great shots on the camera you already have.

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Equipment

  •  Camera body
  •  Backpack – One opens from the back, makes it safer and a lot of secure. Have it organised, using pouches is a good idea making being able to find things quickly.
  • Spare batteries – It’s a good idea to have at least one spare batteries in your backpack.
  • Lenses – only need one of two lenses.
  • Small Camera/Action Camera – Having an action camera/small camera to take quick photos. Action cameras can have window mounts and you can film travelling on train or car.
  • Back Up/Laptop – Backing up your images is super important, save at least one place if not two.
  • Portable Charger – To Keep your phone charged, they also work on charging some cameras as well, so check to see if it will work on yours.
  • Shoulder Strap/Camera Clip – Keeping your camera ready to go at all times.
  • Tripod
  • Camera Filters – Just like with lenses only take one or two.
  • Lenses cleaner
  • Mini Torch
  • Camera Remote

 

Settings for Camera When Moving

When travelling in a moving car/helicopter a good camera settings are:

Manual Mode

Shutter Speed – 1/1000 + (higher for  helicopter)

Aperture – wide depth of field f/8-11

ISO Auto mode

For in a car have the window open.

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Making Money as a Travel Photographer

Making money as a travel photographer can be a slow starter, as you already need to have a portfolio. Speculative or commission based are your two options.

Speculative is where you go to a location first then afterwards try to sell your images, either as stock images, prints or to advertising. This will mean you aren’t guaranteed to make back any money from your trips, so only plan to go to places you would go anyway.

Commission based is going somewhere you already know you will be paid some money for whether you were commissioned by an advertising firm or if you had contacted the tourism board/ local hotels and have an agreement, this will most likely not be the entire cost of your trip but could be a fee or free accommodation in exchange for your images to be used for their advertising.

Website

To be able to make it as a Travel Photographer you need a website and an Instagram account. Instagram account is becoming more and more the source that agencies and clients will go to first before your website, so both need to be uniform and relate to each other. This is your brand and you want one clear image of who you are to come across.

Post Processing

Don’t forget to edit your photos, to make your image look their very best. LandscapePro is great for editing your travel photos quickly, click here to download a free trial.

Becoming a Full-Time Photographer

smallBecoming a full time photographer is a big step to make, you aren’t just becoming a professional photographer but you are also running your own business, meaning your aim is to be profitable and make money.

Here are a few tips to keep your business moving:

Budgeting – This is so key, as if you don’t do this properly, your business won’t succeed. You need to know how much you have to make to meet your current living costs and set aside a little money every month to cover taxes, and also incase any of your equipment breaks and you need to replace.

Prioritizing your time – You are a lot more productive if you have even a rough schedule of what you want to have done each day.

Setting your rates – It can be hard trying to think of what you think you are worth, but it is important not to under sell yourself and you need to earn enough to live off of, also don’t calculate what to charge by assuming you will be fully booked. Base it on what you need, what you think you are worth and in comparison to other local photographers.

Setting aside time to keep your business finance side of things in order – This is the least interesting part of your business, but it is essential that it is not forgotten about. A few hours per week is better than nothing.

Keep building up your client base – you may be busy now but you still need to bring in more clients to make sure you are always busy.

Marketing/Networking – You need people to remember you, as well as bringing in new clients. Sending emails every now and then is helpful, every month or so it makes sure your past clients and people who were interested don’t just forget about you. Too many emails will annoy people and have the opposite effect.

Keep/ get an organiser – This is a great way to keep all the business side of things together in one place.

Appointments book – so you don’t double book, you might think that this is an easy one and it won’t happen to you but it’s easy to forget and write down on scraps of paper that are lying around.

Keep all your receipts for equipment you buy, as these are business expenses so will be taken off money made for the amount of tax you need to pay, try to keep them in date order, but just having them all in one place is enough. If you lose a receipt you can’t claim it.

Insurance – Make sure to insurance your equipment.

Post processing – editing your images to make them look their best is very important, but it can take an age, but with our software (PortraitPro, PortraitPro Body, LandscapePro and Smart Photo Editor) is it really cuts the time you spend editing your photographs.

Good Luck!

 

Logo of The Societies of Photographers

Anthropics wins SWPP Customer Support Award

We’re absolutely delighted to announce that we were awarded the Customer Service Award at The Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers (SWPP) convention in London earlier this month.

This award is particularly special to us as it was awarded based on nominations and votes from you, our customers. We’re committed to providing all of our users with great, online support and we’re always pleased to hear that we’re doing a good job.

 

Logo of the 2017 SWPP Convention

If you’d like to get in touch with our support team, you can use our free online support system.

Alternatively, check out our FAQ page for simple solutions, or our forums to share your results with other users.

 

new years resolutions goal setting

Happy New Year!

At the beginning of the New Year it’s easy to have lots of good intentions for the coming year, and it’s easy to allow them to slide pretty quickly.

As a professional photographer, running your own business, it’s important to take the time to refocus on where you’re going and what you want to achieve in the coming year.

Here are some top tips for staying focused in the year to come.

  • Set goals.

Thinking about what you want to achieve in 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, even 10 year’s time can help you figure out what you need to do now in order to get there.

  • Add milestones.

Having achievable milestones can help you feel that you are working towards achieving your bigger goal.  Set yourself small markers that will help you know that you’re on the way to achieving what you want.  Perhaps it’s a number of clients, or having a number of weddings booked for the year ahead that will help you know that you’re on your way.

  • Take Action

Take Massive Action – Make a Massive Action Plan. Like writing a business plan, writing a Massive Action Plan can help you stay focused on what you’re doing, on what you need to achieve, by when; and unlike a Business Plan, can give you that emotional connection and drive to achieve what it is that you want to achieve.

  • Don’t give up

Get used to the fact that the process of carrying out the day to day tasks may be boring.  You’re a photographer, maybe you don’t love doing your accounts, or advertising yourself, but in order to make your business work, you need to get used to, and learn to enjoy the tasks that keep everything else going.

  • Start now

The sooner you start doing something, even the smallest start means that you’re a little bit closer to achieving your goal.

Download the trial for PortraitPro now, and see how much time you can save on your photo editing.

7 Reasons why being thankful will help you improve your photography and your life.

The secret of happiness is to count your blessings while others are adding up their troubles. ~ William Penn

Thanksgiving 2016

Thanksgiving is a great time to spend with family and loved ones, and as a photographer, it’s great to capture some great family moments.

It’s easy to remember what we’re thankful for when we’re surrounded by family and friends, but it’s an important thing to remember every other day of the year too.

  • Remembering to be thankful means that you’ll be more cheerful and generally happier; which is thought to be good for your health.
  • Being grateful makes you more likely to exercise; this is also good for your health.
  • Instead of focusing on the negative things, focus on the good. You have the skills and the knowledge to be a good photographer and to run your own business. Be grateful for the opportunity to do this.
  • Do a good turn for someone less fortunate than yourself, perhaps donating your images to a local hospital, or take photos for an animal adoption center? Be grateful that you have the time and the abilities to do this.
  • Be grateful for the family and friends you have around you who support you and care for you.
  • If you employ anyone other than just yourself, be grateful for your employee, and show them your gratitude for their hard work. Studies have found that expressions of gratitude are highly motivating, whereas criticism can be de-motivating.
  • Being grateful increases your self-esteem and your productivity. Be grateful for your creativity and your opportunity to work in a creative business.

Being happier and healthier will make it more enjoyable for your clients and anyone you work with. Your clients will enjoy spending their time with you in your studio or out on location, and their enjoyment will shine through your images, making them even better!

Happy Thanksgiving from all at Anthropics Technology!

Where to capture iconic images on your summer vacation

Travelling and taking a break from normality is good for the soul and it’s good for your creativity.  If you’re booking a last minute summer vacation and you need some inspiration for some great iconic images to capture, here’s our top five places to photograph.

New York

The must have shot: Take a trip to Top of The Rock, for that not to be missed shot of Lower Manhattan with the Empire State Building too.

View of Empire State building from Top of the Rock

 

The Non-Tourist shot: it’s virtually impossible to find anything that hasn’t been done before in New York, but check out the rooftop bars for some other unusual angles, plus, they’re free to visit.

Chicago

The must have shot: Everyone heads to Millennium Park and Cloud Gate for the iconic shot of the Bean as the sculpture is affectionately known.

The Non-Tourist shot: The neo-gothic Chicago Tribune Tower may be another very much photographed building, but head to the top of the building, to The Crown at Tribune Tower for an unusual angle on an iconic building.

Philadelphia

The must have shot: In the City of Brotherly Love, it has to be the LOVE sculpture in Love Park, officially known as JFK Plaza, with its view down Benjamin Franklin Parkway to the Art Museum too. 

LOVE Park or JFK Plaza

The Non-Tourist shot: Off the beaten track, head down to Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens for some great mosaic artwork, and wander along South Street to take in the alternative side of the city.

Street Art on South Street Philadelphia

Grand Canyon

The must have shot: The Grand Canyon Skywalk, located at the West Rim, gives anyone the chance to view the Grand Canyon from above, where previously you’d have needed a helicopter to capture a similar view.

The Non-Tourist shot: It’s wise not to go off the beaten track in Grand Canyon National Park, and if you want to go further afield, then take a guide with you.  But for an alternative view, and thought to be the best view, at the South Rim, then take a trip to Bright Angel Lodge, and the Bright Angel Trail.

Photographer at Grand Canyon

Las Vegas

The must have shot: The fountains at the Bellagio are a not to be missed spectacle. The great thing about Vegas is that all the hotels are freely open to wander around like indoor towns within a town.  Try dining at a different hotel every day and a different sight to photograph every night too.

The Non-Tourist shot: Everyone heads to the Strip, but don’t miss a taste of old Vegas, and the light show at the Fremont Street Experience.

With photo editing software PortraitPro andLandscapePro  to help you get the best from your shots, there’s even more reason to book that trip now.  It’s good for you.

How to survive making a living with Travel Photography.

Travel photography is not always going to make you a lot of money, but the freedom of the lifestyle can be particularly attractive.  Living life on your own terms and being your own boss can be a great motivator.  You have the flexibility to take on any project you want, and reject the ones you don’t.

working on the beach

You don’t have to take the plunge immediately; you can start by doing things in your vacation time, and spending weekends photographing in your own town.  Wherever you live, it’s exotic to someone else.

Here’s what else to do before you go:

  • Get all the education you possibly can while you can. Acquiring skills in writing, in technical photography knowledge, in geography, human interest and art is all going to be useful when you have only your skills and ideas to live by.
  • Build up a portfolio and put in the images that you want to be paid to shoot. Don’t use things that you don’t enjoy doing or you’ll end up doing more of them, because people will think you like them.
  • Set up a photography website to host and license your images. Choose one that links through to purchasing prints. This can save you time and makes it easier for the client to purchase your products.  It can be automated throughout the site, and the customer will have very little interaction with you. It’s very time effective for you.
  • If you have no obligations, mortgage contracts, loans, or people to take care of, then you can reduce your expenditure considerably. If you give up paying rent, you also don’t need to pay the gas and electricity bills either.  You can choose where to live, in hostels, hotels, camping, in any country you like.  ( Within visa restrictions etc.)
  • It may be helpful if you’re located somewhere that the exchange rate is favorable to your salary currency. This effectively makes your hotel bill cheaper, and you can afford a higher standard than you would elsewhere.
  • Be prepared to take any assignments. Be flexible and open minded on what jobs you take.
  • Set up accounts with micro stock sites. It may not make you a lot of money, but it should become a steady income. Think about the unusual images you could take for these sites, because the usual angle has already been done so many times.
  • Set up your laptop with all of your photo editing software. Have everything you could need ready, PortraitPro and LandscapePro will save you time on editing in Photoshop, and they can both be used as plugins to Photoshop.
  • Be prepared for anything you might find. Have an app for model releases; you don’t want to not be able to use the image because you missed getting the stranger to sign a release.
  • Look for apps that will save carrying extra things.  In fact, anything you can carry in an app effectively weighs nothing.  Maps, editing tools, ebooks, you can carry all kinds in an app and you’d have your smartphone with you anyway.
  • Keep your kit lightweight. Remember not to take everything you could possibly need. It weighs a lot and you’ll regret carrying that spare lens when you are so tired you can’t make it up the next staircase or mountain peak or down the next road to get the shot. The best camera is the one that you have with you, and having to make do with the reasonable camera you have with you can make you more creative to get the shot you want.

Girl with laptop and camera

When you do leave on your travels, there are some things you need to remember while you’re away to help you stay organized and productive:

  • Keep regular hours when you can. Do what you should to avoid jet lag; don’t work through the night because you’ve just left somewhere where you’d normally be awake at that time. Sometimes that means staying up a little longer, sometimes it means going to bed before you’re ready.
  • Stay focused every day. You need to stay focused on the 2 or 3 things that you need to achieve each day to continue making a living. Set achievable goals, and make sure you do them. Don’t get overloaded by trying to do too much in one day, just take each day at a time and make each day productive.
  • Make room for down-time. Every day that you take a break, is a day that you don’t make any income. This is tough when you’re your own boss. You still need to have the discipline to put in a day’s work, and also to give yourself a day’s break.  There’s no one to throw you out of the office if you’re still working at midnight.
  • Don’t underestimate the people you meet. You never know who you might meet when you’re traveling.  Travel is a great opportunity to meet people you wouldn’t otherwise have bumped into.  Step out of your comfort zone and go somewhere you wouldn’t usually think about going. You might be surprised, and you might find your next project.
  • Do your photo editing as you go. If you’re taking lots of images every day, then will need to back up your photos and should do your editing regularly. Discard the images that won’t make the cut often too, so you’re not storing images that you’ll really delete when you get home.
  • Doing your basic photo editing in PortraitPro or LandscapePro. Doing it while the original is still fresh in your mind, and while you still remember what you wanted to portray in your image is useful.

 

Happy Thanksgiving from Anthropics Technology

Happy Thanksgiving

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Anthropics Technology.

It’s time for Turkey dinners, family fun, and celebrations. It’s a busy time of year, and it’s important to take time to stop and remember what you’re thankful for.

We’re thankful for all of our users, and their feedback on what they like about PortraitPro.  We introduced in version 15, the feature most requested by photographers, the new makeup tools. Without our customer’s feedback we wouldn’t know what they wanted, and we really do listen!

We’re thankful for all our staff, working tirelessly to develop new tools to make sure that they’re the best that they can be, or to answer all of your customer support questions and help you to get your work done faster and easier than ever before, leaving you plenty of time to spend with your loved ones this Holiday.

We’re thankful for our ever- growing social media community, over 340,000 fans on Facebook, and our Twitter, Pinterest and Google+ pages.

We’re thankful for all the journalists and reviewers who have so much enthusiasm for PortraitPro and continue to review our new features and tell you what they think of our software.

Happy Thanksgiving to all our fans and friends.

Happy Thanksgiving from PortraitPro

10 ways to improve your photography skills

As “Back to School” looms for the kids, it’s a good time to think of a new learning project for yourself too.

  • Take a college class, and learn from someone with a solid experience in photography.
  • Join a photographic society, camera club or a meetup group.
  • Ask trusted friends and family for critique.
  • Practice every day. No matter what the subject, or the weather, just keep taking pictures.
  • Learn to problem solve. You may not have the perfect equipment, but you’ll have something that will do a reasonable job.
  • Get to know your camera inside out. Knowing your way around your camera and other photography equipment can help you take a shot quicker when you need to be speedy.
  • Set yourself a photography challenge such as a 365 project. Working within a particular constraint can be interesting and challenging.
  • Get out and visit somewhere new. You’ll be inspired to take pictures of somewhere you haven’t seen before.
  • Get to know all of your photography equipment well, including your post processing equipment. There’s a wealth of tools in PortraitPro to help you make better pictures, and it’s very easy to get going very quickly.
  • Become an art student. Not just in the formal sense by taking a class, but start to consider yourself a student of art of all kinds. Photography is informed by other art forms, and is aesthetically pleasing when it conforms to the same rules as other art.

For instance, the artist Rembrandt is remembered for his style of painting light and shadow on faces, and this method is often employed by photographers. Chiaroscuro is another art term referring to the use of light and dark, and is often associated with the work of Caravaggio, who uses the light and dark in his paintings.

Man with rembrandt lightingFinding other art to photograph, such as sculpture, Haute Couture, or architecture, can help you learn about pleasing lines and composition, which can help you improve your own art.

Start experimenting with PortraitPro, download the free trial today.

Young girl with Violin

8 Tips for successful ‘tween portrait shoots

Taking family portraits is a rewarding experience for any portrait photographer, but tweens can be a difficult phase to capture.

It’s a golden chance to capture a young person’s personality, and it’s a record of their interests now.  Maybe their senior portrait will show a completely new interest, or maybe they’ll stay the same, but it’s a great way to remember how they were right now.

Here are some tips to make the process much easier:

  • If you can photograph them on their own, they’ll be much less self-conscious.
  • Talk to them and explain what you’re doing. Get them involved and they’ll be interested.
  • They’ll also be much happier if you capture them doing something that they love, dancing, playing a musical instrument, painting etc.
  • Ask them if they have any ideas of what they’d like to showcase.
  • Be interested in them.
  • Show them the images that you’re taking, and reassure them that they’re going to get photos that they will like as well as Mom and Dad.
  • Use your portrait editing software to clean up any transient blemishes.
  • Use Smart Photo Editor to offer them some additional, creative and unusual images

Take the pressure off the actual session:

Schedule a planning session with the whole family to talk about what will happen, and what everyone should wear. There’ll be much less tension between parents and kids before the session if the kids know what to expect, and they’ve already agreed on what they’d like to wear. Everyone’s much happier when they’re comfortable in what they’re wearing and kids and tweens have their own ways of expressing themselves too.

Teen girl leaning against tree

Having several different ideas for locations, some indoors and some outdoors, can help; making sure that there’s some variety going on can stop the boredom setting in. It’s not just kids that get bored either!  No one likes getting stuck in the rain, so having a rain plan is essential.

PortraitPro is the best way to clear up any small blemishes, and it can give kids, tweens and teens the  confidence that any blemishes they don’t like can be cleared up, quickly and easily.

They might also like to tell you which effects they like best from the Smart Photo Editor Gallery.  Have some example images ready so they can see what they look like.