Category Archives: traveling

Interview with a Pro – Blake Verdoorn

Canadian Lake Small Canadian Lake – Blake Verdoorn

If you saw our recent LandscapePro 2 tutorial, you’ll already be aware of the work of up-and-coming landscape photographer, Blake Verdoorn.

At only 23 years old, his work has already been published by National Geographic Travel, Photographer’s Forum, and many more. We were thrilled to get an interview with Blake to learn more about his experiences and ambitions…

How old were you when you got into photography?

I picked up my first camera about 3 years ago when I traveled to Alaska with my Grandfather. My parents wanted me to bring a camera along so I could document the trip. At the time, I thought nothing of it. Nor did I have any experience or knowledge of photography. I remember coming home and really being taken back by the images I had captured. Again, I knew nothing about composition, DoF, etc., but something about those images resonated with me. They still do. Fast-forward a year, I decided to buy my first camera. I was 21. I’m 23 now and it has been one heck a ride since that decision.

What inspired you to start?

I have always had a deep passion for the outdoors. Living in Dallas, Texas, it’s always incredibly special to get the opportunity to venture out and experience this beautiful world. After come back from Alaska, looking through the images from the trip, something clicked. I remember sifting through landscape images from professional photographers after that trip thinking, “I want to be able to do that. I want to bring home stunning photographs like this”. So I began dedicating all of my time to learning. At the time, no one close to me was really understanding why or what I was doing. I don’t come from a necessarily artistic family, so to branch off and do something unique and different had friends and family questioning. They still are. I don’t think they’ll ever stop. I question myself too. It’s good. I reminds me that what I’m doing matters.

Big Bend SmallBig Bend River, Texas – Blake Verdoorn

You’ve traveled to some really amazing places and met people from different cultures, what has been your most inspiring experience so far?

I’ve got two really great experiences that I’ll never forget. In 2013, I had the opportunity to backpack Europe (I don’t have any photos from that trip because my camera was stolen). During that trip we met an Australian named Sam. She was staying at the same hostel in San Sebastian, Spain. Whenever we leave for these big trips, about to meet people from all over the world, you develop this idea that these people are somehow vastly different from you because they grew up on the other side of the world. I remember going to dinner with her and the group of friends I was with and talking, getting to know each other. It was there that I realized she was no different than us. We had the same stories of love, hurt, triumph, sadness, loneliness, fears etc. We grew up listening to the same music, playing the same sports and going through similar motions as kids and students. So here five guys were, from Dallas, Texas, laughing and sharing about the complexities of life with a girl from Sydney, Australia, in San Sebastian, Spain. It was an incredibly beautiful and humanizing experience.

Secondly, was about a year ago when I was photographing in New Zealand. My cousin and I had taken a gondola to the top of a mountain in Queenstown to photograph the sunset. Up top was another group of photographers doing the same thing. Max and Sam (different Sam) were both from Germany, touring the South Island on a photo expedition. Similar to Spain, we began talking and getting to know each other. This time, it was much more about the photography community. We were talking gear, styles, techniques, software; we talked about the frustrations and inspirations of photography, but mostly about the joy it brings us in our lives. Again, it made the world feel very small. The same idea in Spain, that people, with seemingly vast differences, can come together so quickly over shared passions and a love for beautiful images. The world of photography is massive, but instances like this make you feel like the community is much tighter knit than we think it is.

In meeting with people from all around the world and hearing their stories about upbringings,  their dreams, fears, and emotions, I’ve found that we are all much more similar than we thought we are—sometimes scarily similar. If you just take the time to get to know someone, you’ll find that everyone is the same.

Which image are you most proud of? Which means the most to you?

I’m most proud of a shot that I took when hiking through Glacier National Park in Montana. This particular shot has won a couple awards and has been published in a couple of photography books. We had decided to do a hike called Scenic Point. It was a high-elevation hike up the mountains that overlooks Two Medicine Lake. We knew we didn’t have a lot of time so we hurried to the peak. The sun began to set on our way down and we were met with a breathtaking orange and red sky that was reflecting off the lake way below us. It was an absolutely stunning view.

Glacier NP SmallTwo Medicine Lake – Blake Verdoorn

An image that I took of my friends outside of Monument Valley means the most to me, simply because it captures my friends so well. We wanted to remake the scene from Forrest Gump when he is running and finally decides to turn around. That scene was filmed at mile-marker 13 driving towards Monument Valley from Utah. So we got out of our cars, pitched our most bearded, Tom-Hanks-esque, friend to play Forrest and the rest of the friends were his herd of followers. It’s significance is a deeply personal one. It’s a great reminder of those guys, how much they mean to me, and the fun we have had together travelling the world.

What would you say is the hardest part of landscape photography?
What is the greatest reward?

Landscape photography, like any genre of photography really, is its own monster. There are so many things that are specific to landscape photography that don’t really have to do with any other genre. Lens selection, composition, light type and availability, etc. Sometimes it gets a bad reputation because anyone can travel to Alaska or Yosemite and take a pretty picture. There is no denying that one. However, you can always tell the difference between someone who takes a picture of Yosemite Valley and someone who photographs Yosemite Valley. The hardest part specifically is really just the getting there. More often than not, you have to totally beat yourself up to get a shot. Whether that is a sunrise you don’t want to wake up for, or a hike that is a little too difficult (especially with 10 extra pounds of photo equipment). What really great landscape photography takes is a whole bunch of extra time. A lot of these professional landscape photographers will wait for hours for the right light and the right conditions. Most of the time, I don’t have that kind of time. So it requires much more inventive ways to get great shots. The second hardest part is simply the money. Landscape photography (with exception) has little money to be made. Unfortunately, that is just the truth. If you want to make a living off of landscape (which I don’t), good luck and let me know how you did it because I’m still trying to find out.

The greatest reward is when you just beat yourself up to get to where you want to be, and you look at that tiny little screen on the back of your camera and you think, “yes”. There is always this feeling of certainty once you get the shot. With all the unknowns that lead up to getting the shot, it’s great to be able to look at your result and think, “wow, this is gorgeous”. I always make sure to get my shot in camera, then take a mental shot for the memory. I always hate when I return home and realize I was so busy shooting I forgot to look at my subject with my actual eyes…

It isn’t always a “yes, this is the shot” type moment though. I have plenty of shots where I went home thinking I didn’t have anything only to find a image that is breathtaking. Those are equally as rewarding. They are like little surprises just waiting to be unveiled.

You photograph landscapes but also portraits and wedding photography, what different approaches do you have to take to these different genres?

The biggest difference is lens selection. I would never shoot a landscape with a 35 or 50 mm f/1.4 lens. I suppose you could. And you would probably get great results. But it’s just not practical. My only overlap in lens selection is the 70-200. I love shooting landscapes at 200mm. When you compose it right, you get this dramatic compression that makes mountains tower over you foreground. To me, that is so much more majestic than shrimpy little mountains in the background of a wide-angle shot.

Mountain Tops - RMNP smallRocky Mountain National Park – Blake Verdoorn

The other difference is paying attention to light. The way I look at light is significantly different in weddings and portrait than in landscapes. When I’m photographing people my only thought is, “find soft light”. When shooting landscape, there isn’t much you can do to control your subject and the light that shines upon it. Obviously changing the time of day changes the light on a mountain. But if I’m hiking and shooting at the same time and limited by my time in a park, my only control is how I compose. So I try and find interesting foregrounds, natural frames, leading lines, etc. to dominate the image rather than beautiful light. If I have the chance to photography a landscape in beautiful light, then great! The perfect storm! But like I said, that isn’t always the case though. My three main landscape lenses are: 24-120 f/4, 70-200 f/2.8, and 15-30 f/2.8

If you could travel to anywhere in the world for a photo-shoot, where would you go?

As cliché as it sounds (and I hate that it’s even cliché), it’s Iceland. I have been trying to get there for four years now and have yet to have the opportunity. It’s driving me crazy. There is some much wild, untamed and forceful beauty there. It’s somewhat of a bummer that it is kinda photographed out. But that doesn’t deter me. I don’t care.

I would love to go back to Africa for a safari. I was there when I was a child and remember being blown away by a photographer’s images of the animals that we were getting to see. I’d love to go back with a monster lens and have a blast shooting those other-wordly animals.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?

I am getting ready to go to graduate school to study Journalism and Advertising. I really hope to get more into videography and filmmaking and start shooting documentary.

The greatest think that I am lacking right now is a cause. I shoot because I enjoy shooting. There is nothing wrong with that, but I want my images to stand for something. I want people to see my work and think, “that is more than just a pretty picture that’s the voice of (insert cause here)”. So that’s what I hope. I feel like I have “found my calling” in photography, but I need to find my calling within my calling if you will.

I hope to be running a production company one day. I think it will happen. I just need to be patient. I have plenty of time. I hope to be married, probably have kids. Own a house. Make more money than what I do now. Have some resemblance of a stable life. I need to add that in-case my family reads this.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone looking to start photographing landscapes, what would it be?

Invest in good equipment. Good equipment and good lenses make a big difference. While I am a proponent of “it’s not the camera, it’s the camera-man”, there is also “it’s kinda also about the camera”. I will get better results with some primo glass on a full-frame camera than if I shoot on a entry-level kit lens and crop sensor (that being said, my favorite shots were shot on a kit lens, entry level camera, so I just debunked my own point).

Shoot all the time. Even it’s it’s not landscape. The reason I started shooting weddings and portraits was because I loved to shoot but couldn’t shoot landscape all the time. So I filled my time with other stuff I could shoot. The more you shoot the better you’ll get. Just like everything else in life.

Don’t expect to make any money off of landscape shots. I have yet to make a dime off of any of my landscapes. There are people all over the world making a living off of landscapes but it’s really hard and really competitive. So if you love traveling and love photographing, than make it a personal quest to get better. Who knows where it will lead you.

Lastly, have fun. If you’re beating yourself up because your images aren’t as good as professionals, than you take the fun out of it. Use professionals as inspiration and motivation to get better, but don’t get down because your images don’t look like theirs.

Thank you Blake for taking the time to talk to us. You can follow Blake’s adventures and see more of his work on his website and via Unsplash.

Travel Photography 101: Everything You Need to Know

travel

Travel Photography sounds wonderful but there’s a fair bit to it, here are a few tips, equipment list suggestion and how to make money for Travel Photography.

Tips

Research – Look up where you are going, what is around and put together a list of places that you want to photograph. Be selective so you can spend a fair amount of time in each location to get the best shots possible.

Know your gear – Whether you are buying new gear or not, a little before you go, it is a good idea to have a play around a week or two before you go away. Just to refresh your memory.

Get up early/stay up late – In order to catch the best shots, sunrise and sunset usually are the best time to photograph, so take this into consideration when planning your shots.

Picking the right accommodation – Choosing the right location for accommodation is really important. Be close to where you want to shot.

Get inspired – Look at other photographers photographs of where you are going, to help you decide what locations you want to go to and to be inspired. Ask them where the photo was taken if it isn’t written anywhere.

Experience their culture – Whilst travelling try to immerse in their culture as much as possible – food, music and local markets, etc.

Travel light – Try to travel as light as possible, don’t load yourself down by trying to take every camera and lens you own with you, just take a main lens and one to zoom, especially if you are going trekking or hiking. You don’t want to be too loaded down.

Be selective of where you are visiting – Don’t try and squeeze absolutely every location there is to visit, pick your favorite and spend more time there taking pictures, rather than rushing around trying to capture everything.

Don’t always be behind your lens – Experience where you are rather than constantly being behind your camera.

High angle shot – Try to find somewhere to take a good birds eye shot.

Your camera doesn’t have to break the bank – Don’t feel the need to go out and buy a brand new top end camera for your trip, you can get great shots on the camera you already have.

shutterstock_415617442

Equipment

  •  Camera body
  •  Backpack – One opens from the back, makes it safer and a lot of secure. Have it organised, using pouches is a good idea making being able to find things quickly.
  • Spare batteries – It’s a good idea to have at least one spare batteries in your backpack.
  • Lenses – only need one of two lenses.
  • Small Camera/Action Camera – Having an action camera/small camera to take quick photos. Action cameras can have window mounts and you can film travelling on train or car.
  • Back Up/Laptop – Backing up your images is super important, save at least one place if not two.
  • Portable Charger – To Keep your phone charged, they also work on charging some cameras as well, so check to see if it will work on yours.
  • Shoulder Strap/Camera Clip – Keeping your camera ready to go at all times.
  • Tripod
  • Camera Filters – Just like with lenses only take one or two.
  • Lenses cleaner
  • Mini Torch
  • Camera Remote

 

Settings for Camera When Moving

When travelling in a moving car/helicopter a good camera settings are:

Manual Mode

Shutter Speed – 1/1000 + (higher for  helicopter)

Aperture – wide depth of field f/8-11

ISO Auto mode

For in a car have the window open.

shutterstock_298757792small

Making Money as a Travel Photographer

Making money as a travel photographer can be a slow starter, as you already need to have a portfolio. Speculative or commission based are your two options.

Speculative is where you go to a location first then afterwards try to sell your images, either as stock images, prints or to advertising. This will mean you aren’t guaranteed to make back any money from your trips, so only plan to go to places you would go anyway.

Commission based is going somewhere you already know you will be paid some money for whether you were commissioned by an advertising firm or if you had contacted the tourism board/ local hotels and have an agreement, this will most likely not be the entire cost of your trip but could be a fee or free accommodation in exchange for your images to be used for their advertising.

Website

To be able to make it as a Travel Photographer you need a website and an Instagram account. Instagram account is becoming more and more the source that agencies and clients will go to first before your website, so both need to be uniform and relate to each other. This is your brand and you want one clear image of who you are to come across.

Post Processing

Don’t forget to edit your photos, to make your image look their very best. LandscapePro is great for editing your travel photos quickly, click here to download a free trial.

Where to capture iconic images on your summer vacation

Travelling and taking a break from normality is good for the soul and it’s good for your creativity.  If you’re booking a last minute summer vacation and you need some inspiration for some great iconic images to capture, here’s our top five places to photograph.

New York

The must have shot: Take a trip to Top of The Rock, for that not to be missed shot of Lower Manhattan with the Empire State Building too.

View of Empire State building from Top of the Rock

 

The Non-Tourist shot: it’s virtually impossible to find anything that hasn’t been done before in New York, but check out the rooftop bars for some other unusual angles, plus, they’re free to visit.

Chicago

The must have shot: Everyone heads to Millennium Park and Cloud Gate for the iconic shot of the Bean as the sculpture is affectionately known.

The Non-Tourist shot: The neo-gothic Chicago Tribune Tower may be another very much photographed building, but head to the top of the building, to The Crown at Tribune Tower for an unusual angle on an iconic building.

Philadelphia

The must have shot: In the City of Brotherly Love, it has to be the LOVE sculpture in Love Park, officially known as JFK Plaza, with its view down Benjamin Franklin Parkway to the Art Museum too. 

LOVE Park or JFK Plaza

The Non-Tourist shot: Off the beaten track, head down to Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens for some great mosaic artwork, and wander along South Street to take in the alternative side of the city.

Street Art on South Street Philadelphia

Grand Canyon

The must have shot: The Grand Canyon Skywalk, located at the West Rim, gives anyone the chance to view the Grand Canyon from above, where previously you’d have needed a helicopter to capture a similar view.

The Non-Tourist shot: It’s wise not to go off the beaten track in Grand Canyon National Park, and if you want to go further afield, then take a guide with you.  But for an alternative view, and thought to be the best view, at the South Rim, then take a trip to Bright Angel Lodge, and the Bright Angel Trail.

Photographer at Grand Canyon

Las Vegas

The must have shot: The fountains at the Bellagio are a not to be missed spectacle. The great thing about Vegas is that all the hotels are freely open to wander around like indoor towns within a town.  Try dining at a different hotel every day and a different sight to photograph every night too.

The Non-Tourist shot: Everyone heads to the Strip, but don’t miss a taste of old Vegas, and the light show at the Fremont Street Experience.

With photo editing software PortraitPro andLandscapePro  to help you get the best from your shots, there’s even more reason to book that trip now.  It’s good for you.

How to survive making a living with Travel Photography.

Travel photography is not always going to make you a lot of money, but the freedom of the lifestyle can be particularly attractive.  Living life on your own terms and being your own boss can be a great motivator.  You have the flexibility to take on any project you want, and reject the ones you don’t.

working on the beach

You don’t have to take the plunge immediately; you can start by doing things in your vacation time, and spending weekends photographing in your own town.  Wherever you live, it’s exotic to someone else.

Here’s what else to do before you go:

  • Get all the education you possibly can while you can. Acquiring skills in writing, in technical photography knowledge, in geography, human interest and art is all going to be useful when you have only your skills and ideas to live by.
  • Build up a portfolio and put in the images that you want to be paid to shoot. Don’t use things that you don’t enjoy doing or you’ll end up doing more of them, because people will think you like them.
  • Set up a photography website to host and license your images. Choose one that links through to purchasing prints. This can save you time and makes it easier for the client to purchase your products.  It can be automated throughout the site, and the customer will have very little interaction with you. It’s very time effective for you.
  • If you have no obligations, mortgage contracts, loans, or people to take care of, then you can reduce your expenditure considerably. If you give up paying rent, you also don’t need to pay the gas and electricity bills either.  You can choose where to live, in hostels, hotels, camping, in any country you like.  ( Within visa restrictions etc.)
  • It may be helpful if you’re located somewhere that the exchange rate is favorable to your salary currency. This effectively makes your hotel bill cheaper, and you can afford a higher standard than you would elsewhere.
  • Be prepared to take any assignments. Be flexible and open minded on what jobs you take.
  • Set up accounts with micro stock sites. It may not make you a lot of money, but it should become a steady income. Think about the unusual images you could take for these sites, because the usual angle has already been done so many times.
  • Set up your laptop with all of your photo editing software. Have everything you could need ready, PortraitPro and LandscapePro will save you time on editing in Photoshop, and they can both be used as plugins to Photoshop.
  • Be prepared for anything you might find. Have an app for model releases; you don’t want to not be able to use the image because you missed getting the stranger to sign a release.
  • Look for apps that will save carrying extra things.  In fact, anything you can carry in an app effectively weighs nothing.  Maps, editing tools, ebooks, you can carry all kinds in an app and you’d have your smartphone with you anyway.
  • Keep your kit lightweight. Remember not to take everything you could possibly need. It weighs a lot and you’ll regret carrying that spare lens when you are so tired you can’t make it up the next staircase or mountain peak or down the next road to get the shot. The best camera is the one that you have with you, and having to make do with the reasonable camera you have with you can make you more creative to get the shot you want.

Girl with laptop and camera

When you do leave on your travels, there are some things you need to remember while you’re away to help you stay organized and productive:

  • Keep regular hours when you can. Do what you should to avoid jet lag; don’t work through the night because you’ve just left somewhere where you’d normally be awake at that time. Sometimes that means staying up a little longer, sometimes it means going to bed before you’re ready.
  • Stay focused every day. You need to stay focused on the 2 or 3 things that you need to achieve each day to continue making a living. Set achievable goals, and make sure you do them. Don’t get overloaded by trying to do too much in one day, just take each day at a time and make each day productive.
  • Make room for down-time. Every day that you take a break, is a day that you don’t make any income. This is tough when you’re your own boss. You still need to have the discipline to put in a day’s work, and also to give yourself a day’s break.  There’s no one to throw you out of the office if you’re still working at midnight.
  • Don’t underestimate the people you meet. You never know who you might meet when you’re traveling.  Travel is a great opportunity to meet people you wouldn’t otherwise have bumped into.  Step out of your comfort zone and go somewhere you wouldn’t usually think about going. You might be surprised, and you might find your next project.
  • Do your photo editing as you go. If you’re taking lots of images every day, then will need to back up your photos and should do your editing regularly. Discard the images that won’t make the cut often too, so you’re not storing images that you’ll really delete when you get home.
  • Doing your basic photo editing in PortraitPro or LandscapePro. Doing it while the original is still fresh in your mind, and while you still remember what you wanted to portray in your image is useful.

 

LandscapePro software

Anthropics Technology announces LandscapePro

 

We’re delighted to announce this week the launch of our brand new landscape editing software, LandscapePro.  

Just like PortraitPro, LandscapePro  is available in standalone and Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom and Elements plug-in editions. The new software radically simplifies and speeds up outdoor and nature photo retouching. It includes landscape relighting, sky replacement, 3D depth estimation, a depth of field simulator, distance controls, intelligent selection tools, and photo-adaptive controls among other powerful features. With one-click presets and targeted editing available, users can create beautiful landscapes in seconds.

Woodland before and after

LandscapePro is a new way to enhance pictures that rises to the challenges and nuances of landscape photography. It assumes no prior knowledge or technical skills, and photographers can create unique, dramatic effects quickly.

“Inspired by the success of Anthropics’s PortraitPro software, we are delighted to introduce a new product to help photographers expand their creativity and take landscape retouching to the next level,” said Andrew Berend, CEO, Anthropics. “LandscapePro offers an innovative and easy way to create stunning landscape photography, and can be used by novices or experienced photographers alike. As its intelligent controls uniquely adapt to the features of each photo, it enables photographers to do incredible things with their outdoor photos simply by using sliders.”

Easily enhance landscape photos. LandscapePro contains a host of unique tools to enable anyone to create beautiful scenic photographs.

  • Intelligent selection tools.
  • Unique editing controls that adapt to the photo.
  • Easy-to-use slider interface.
  • No technical skills required.
  • LandscapePro Studio handles RAW files and can be run as a Photoshop, Lightroom and Elements plug-in.

Wedding image LandscapePro

 

 

Check out the LandscapePro video here. 

Download your trial of LandscapePro today.

 

 

10 Things to photograph on the last weekend of summer

Whether you want to escape the city, or head to the city this weekend, there are lots of things to photograph this weekend. If the weather’s good, it’s a great time to get out with your camera and shoot some last shots of summer.

Here are our top 5 interesting cities to see this weekend:

Philadelphia

In the City :  Climb the Rocky steps, pay what you wish on the first Sunday of the month, and pay a visit to the Art Museum, for some great, iconic images of the city too. This is one of the best views of Center City. 

Out of town: Head to Longwood Gardens for Nightscape: A Light and Sound Experience. Get some great images with light and dark.

Chicago

In the City: For the best architectural views of Chicago, take the Architectural River tour. Afterwards, stop off at Millennium Park to see the Bean. There’s always something interesting to discover in the Park.

Out of Town: Not so far out of town, you can hit the beach. One of the great things about Chicago is that you’re so close to a beach. Walk up Michigan Avenue to find Oak Street beach.  It’s not the ocean, but it’s still a great place to soak up the sun and get some great images of the sky scrapers in the background. The kids will love it too.

New York

In the City: In the city that never sleeps it’s hard to choose what to do, but on Labor Day Weekend,  most of the usual tourist destinations will still be open, all the restaurants and shops will still be open too. Live like a tourist for a day, even if you’re not. Check out the view from Top of the Rock, for the best view of the Empire State Building!

View of Empire State building from Top of the Rock

Out of Town: It’s a long way to go to leave NYC behind you, but with Central Park right in the middle, why would you need to escape to the countryside? You can manage to pretend you’re away from it all, sunbathing and taking in the greenery.  Take a picnic, and check out the Carousel too.  The city’s so big that there are several parks to choose from, but Central Park’s almost 6 times bigger than Vatican City, so there’s plenty of space to escape the bustling crowds and find your own place to relax.

 Washington D.C.

In the City: With flight and gas prices down again, it’s a great time to discover the capital, and the museums are free to visit too. Check out the National Gallery of Art, across the street from the National Archives. Visit all the museums, they’re all free!

Out of Town: Why not visit the University of Maryland’s Dairy for some handmade ice cream. As the end of summer arrives, you can capture some portraits of people eating their ice creams.

Milwaukee

In the City:  Check out the Harley Davidson Factory this weekend at the Custom Bike show event. There’ll be lots of people willing to pose with their bikes and there’s music and food too, so there’s something all the family can enjoy. Further down 6th street, you can take in another tour, Milwaukee’s hidden gem, Great Lakes Distillery, Wisconsin’s first distillery since prohibition.

Out of Town: Take a trip to Leon’s frozen custard on South 27th, for some typical Wisconsin frozen desert, and that retro 50’s feel. Supposed to be the inspiration for the diner in Happy Days, Leon’s still has it’s original signage.

Wherever you are this Labor Day weekend, look for some interesting portraits. Take the time to look around you and see what interesting images you can find. PortraitPro will  help you with your portrait retouching, so you always get the best images. Try it for free today.

In Venice on Vacation

Taking your photo editing software on vacation

Whether you’re jetting off to somewhere exotic , or staying closer to home, it’s easy to do your photo editing on the go.

PortraitPro 12 has time saving features so you can set a customized preset, and leave the software to do the hard work.  Set your own preset to be the default. Everytime you open an image, the software will choose the settings that you’ve designed.

You can take your software anywhere, if you purchase from here, then you get an instant download, ready to go in minutes.

Try it out for free

 

Try out Smart Photo Editor too!

Happy 4th July!

 

Family on 4th July

Whether it’s grilling out in the park, on the beach, or catching the fireworks, there’s something for everyone to see and do on 4th July.

If you’re at home, check out your local fireworks displays and if you’ve got a trip planned, don’t forget to find out what happens there too. You might find something you’ve never seen before.

Benjamin  Frankin said: “ Time is Money”.

PortraitPro Studio Max batch processing can save you time on your portrait editing this weekend, leaving you more time to spend with your family.

Enjoy the sunshine and the savings! Download a free trial today.

 

Photographing Street Art

Noticing the details is what street photography is about; capturing the essence of a place, or a person, to really give an insight in to the soul.

One of the often overlooked details in a place is the street art. So often graffiti is unsightly but it’s becoming a more recognized art form, and artist’s works such as Banksy (if they can be removed,) are selling for hundreds of thousands.

Many cities have specially designated places for street art and murals. One place that has a good street art project is the Mural Arts Program in Philadelphia.

Street art, South Street Philly

Street art on the corner of 6th and South Streets, Philadelphia.

An image search for Mural Arts Philadelphia will find many, many more images like this.

South Street Philadelphia is particularly famous for its art. It’s off the beaten track, away from the tourist spots and the historical landmarks that Philly is known for; but for those in the know, South Street is a great place to capture the essence of the City of Brotherly Love.

As with any city, do your research before you go. Check out any particular points of interest and make a list of things you want to find, and then you can be more focused in your wanderings.

In San Francisco it’s Clarion Alley, and in London, you want to check out the East End, Shoreditch, Hoxton and Brick Lane, although Camden and Soho are also known for their street art too.

There is street art in every city, but some cities have really embraced providing legal space for the artists. Whatever kind of art you produce, whether it’s photography, paintings, paintings on walls, we’ve all got an opinion to express, and photographing the work can help its message to be transported even further.

Check out our Pinterest Board for more Street Art around the world.

If you’re photographing in a large city, it’s often hard to capture the image without people in the photo. You might want to keep those people in your images; they are all part of the urban landscape.  You can use your portrait editing software to ensure that these people look their natural best.

Smart Photo Editor can give you some great effects to really enhance your images.

Download a free trial of PortraitPro here, and Smart Photo Editor here.

Summer with a camera

50 Ideas for Summer Photo Challenge

If a 365 day photo challenge seems too much, how about a project just for the summer?

Taking on a project can help to stimulate your creativity.  Just as having a business goal can keep you focused on where you want to get to with your business, having a goal for your creativity can keep you focused on being creative; helping you to think outside the box.

Check out our 50 ideas for summer photos:

  1. Ice cream
  2. Fireworks
  3. A full moon
  4. Colorful flowers
  5. A picnic
  6. Childhood friends
  7. Daydreaming
  8. On the beach
  9. At the park
  10. Grilling out
  11. Chilling out
  12. Fun in the sun
  13. Cool drinks
  14. Sunglasses and sun lotion
  15. A June wedding
  16. 4th July
  17. August vacation
  18. Labor Day
  19. Museum visit
  20. A silhouette
  21. Pets enjoying the sun
  22. Summer sports games
  23. Sunrise
  24. Black and white
  25. Something red
  26. After dark
  27. A special occasion
  28. Making waves
  29. Something that flies
  30. My favorite food
  31. Close-up
  32. A new friend
  33. Things that grow
  34. A treasured moment
  35. My favorite place
  36. Something tiny
  37. Laughter
  38. Shadows
  39. All dressed up
  40. Something exotic
  41. Movement
  42. Words
  43. A low angle
  44. Curves
  45. Leading lines
  46. On the street
  47. A kiss
  48. A self-portrait
  49. Reflections
  50. Happiness

Don’t forget to use PortraitPro on your people photos, and why not try out Smart Photo Editor for everything else?

Now why not share the results with us on our Facebook page?

Check out our Pinterest pages for more inspiration.

Download your free trial of PortraitPro here.