Category Archives: LandscapePro

LandscapePro 2 Tutorial – Sky Reflections

This week we’ll be looking at one of our other products, LandscapePro 2.

LandscapePro is an intelligent, easy-to-use and powerful tool for outdoor photographers. Whether you’re looking for simple color corrections or total transformations, LandscapePro puts dozens of intelligent controls at your fingertips.
To join in with the tutorial, download the free trial and head on over to Unsplash and download the example image. This image is provided by landscape and wedding photographer Blake Verdoorn. We’re hoping to score an interview with him in the next few weeks so look out for that in an upcoming post!

Don’t forget to share your results with us via our Facebook page.
If you have any questions or need assistance, our customer support team will be happy to help.

Travel Photography 101: Everything You Need to Know

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Travel Photography sounds wonderful but there’s a fair bit to it, here are a few tips, equipment list suggestion and how to make money for Travel Photography.

Tips

Research – Look up where you are going, what is around and put together a list of places that you want to photograph. Be selective so you can spend a fair amount of time in each location to get the best shots possible.

Know your gear – Whether you are buying new gear or not, a little before you go, it is a good idea to have a play around a week or two before you go away. Just to refresh your memory.

Get up early/stay up late – In order to catch the best shots, sunrise and sunset usually are the best time to photograph, so take this into consideration when planning your shots.

Picking the right accommodation – Choosing the right location for accommodation is really important. Be close to where you want to shot.

Get inspired – Look at other photographers photographs of where you are going, to help you decide what locations you want to go to and to be inspired. Ask them where the photo was taken if it isn’t written anywhere.

Experience their culture – Whilst travelling try to immerse in their culture as much as possible – food, music and local markets, etc.

Travel light – Try to travel as light as possible, don’t load yourself down by trying to take every camera and lens you own with you, just take a main lens and one to zoom, especially if you are going trekking or hiking. You don’t want to be too loaded down.

Be selective of where you are visiting – Don’t try and squeeze absolutely every location there is to visit, pick your favorite and spend more time there taking pictures, rather than rushing around trying to capture everything.

Don’t always be behind your lens – Experience where you are rather than constantly being behind your camera.

High angle shot – Try to find somewhere to take a good birds eye shot.

Your camera doesn’t have to break the bank – Don’t feel the need to go out and buy a brand new top end camera for your trip, you can get great shots on the camera you already have.

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Equipment

  •  Camera body
  •  Backpack – One opens from the back, makes it safer and a lot of secure. Have it organised, using pouches is a good idea making being able to find things quickly.
  • Spare batteries – It’s a good idea to have at least one spare batteries in your backpack.
  • Lenses – only need one of two lenses.
  • Small Camera/Action Camera – Having an action camera/small camera to take quick photos. Action cameras can have window mounts and you can film travelling on train or car.
  • Back Up/Laptop – Backing up your images is super important, save at least one place if not two.
  • Portable Charger – To Keep your phone charged, they also work on charging some cameras as well, so check to see if it will work on yours.
  • Shoulder Strap/Camera Clip – Keeping your camera ready to go at all times.
  • Tripod
  • Camera Filters – Just like with lenses only take one or two.
  • Lenses cleaner
  • Mini Torch
  • Camera Remote

 

Settings for Camera When Moving

When travelling in a moving car/helicopter a good camera settings are:

Manual Mode

Shutter Speed – 1/1000 + (higher for  helicopter)

Aperture – wide depth of field f/8-11

ISO Auto mode

For in a car have the window open.

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Making Money as a Travel Photographer

Making money as a travel photographer can be a slow starter, as you already need to have a portfolio. Speculative or commission based are your two options.

Speculative is where you go to a location first then afterwards try to sell your images, either as stock images, prints or to advertising. This will mean you aren’t guaranteed to make back any money from your trips, so only plan to go to places you would go anyway.

Commission based is going somewhere you already know you will be paid some money for whether you were commissioned by an advertising firm or if you had contacted the tourism board/ local hotels and have an agreement, this will most likely not be the entire cost of your trip but could be a fee or free accommodation in exchange for your images to be used for their advertising.

Website

To be able to make it as a Travel Photographer you need a website and an Instagram account. Instagram account is becoming more and more the source that agencies and clients will go to first before your website, so both need to be uniform and relate to each other. This is your brand and you want one clear image of who you are to come across.

Post Processing

Don’t forget to edit your photos, to make your image look their very best. LandscapePro is great for editing your travel photos quickly, click here to download a free trial.

How to Improve Your Landscape Photographs

So you have taken your photos and are now back home looking through them. They are good but not exactly how you pictured them, slightly dull in color. This simple tutorial takes your photographs to that next stage in minutes using LandscapePro.

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After loading your image into LandscapePro, label everything in the picture and click continue.

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LandscapePro does a pretty good job and selecting the area for you but you will need to adjust the selection a little, simply click on a label and drag covering everything that is said object. Do this for each label.

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Once you have finished click on ‘Continue’.

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Now if you have a horizon in your picture you can match this up to it, then click ‘Continue’.

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There are now a row of tabs, the first is Global Presets tab, there are many choices, I chose ‘Improver’ for my photo.

Next I work way down one at a time, some I turned off as they didn’t need changing as I had already applied a preset to the whole image.

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Work your way through each section, one at a time. There are preset options or if you prefer you can click the sliders option and adjust everything yourself, or pick a preset and edit it if its not quite right for your photo.

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before and after

The photograph still looks recognizable, but vastly improved with the few changes made, that took a matter of minutes.

Click here to buy LandscapePro and download a free trial.

How to Improve Your Wildlife Photos in Minutes

When you look through your photos, do you sometimes feel like you didn’t quite capture the true colors?

Animals are often one of these photos. Well here is a short tutorial on how to improve these photos, using LandscapePro and takes only minutes to do.

 

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Once you have opened LandscapePro and uploaded your photo, you get asked to label what is in your photo.

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After labeling the area, LandscapePro does a pretty good job and selecting the area for you but just need to go use the Pull tool and others on the left hand side to get this how you want, though you can come back and correct this later.

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The next step is choosing what to change first, for this I am going to be getting the animal (tiger) first, so click on the animal tab to get the sliders to show.

It’s really easy to adjust the appearance of the animal, its easy and quick, moving the sliders you seeing the change instantly. If you liked it best how it was originally just double click on the slider.

There is also Presets tab at the top where you opened the animal tab, click on this, there is a long list of different presetting you can apply to your picture rather than trying to get your desired outcome using the sliders.

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Next I click on the water tab, to change the settings, just a little bit.

After this you can change the picture as a whole, but if you have already edited all the image separately you don’t need to use this.

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The Tigers orange fur really stands out now in the finished photograph.

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To see just how dramatic the difference is, above is the before and after, side by side. This only took a few minutes to do!

Making your wildlife photos really stand out, download your free trial of LandscapePro today.

Check out this tutorial on black and white wildlife photography.